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Miscellaneous Notes on the History of
Government in Chester County

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This file contains assorted facts from Chester County history collected by students in the HIS480 "Computer methods of historical research" class at West Chester University. Each fact consists of specific information, a reference note to its source, and a date. The "facts" are organized in chronological order.

This file has not been completely proofread, nor have the sources been verified, so use this material with caution.

Collected by Jim Jones, David Flogaus, Kelly Kulp-Bosler, Mike Wolford and Bob Gialanella (Spring 1995). Additional information collected by Jim Jones, Robert Gregory, Robert Troutman, Nancy Hershey, Christopher Waychunas, Kenneth McFadden, John Morrison, Scott Harre and Daniel Cleary (Spring 1996). Last edited by Vincent Civiletti (April 29, 1996).


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1679 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 72.

     The original Chester county courthouse was located at Upland
     (Chester) in 1679 and was known as the "House of Defense."  

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1682 Source: Norma Jacob, editor, QUAKER ROOTS: THE STORY OF
     WESTERN QUARTERLY MEETING OF PHILADELPHIA YEARLY MEETING OF
     THE RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (Kennett Square, Pa.:
     Graphics Standard, Inc, 1980), 1.

     The first Quaker settlement in Pennsylvania was at Upland, a
     Swedish settlement on the banks of the Delaware River where
     modern Chester is located.  The town was renamed in 1682 by
     William Penn when he arrived.

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1683 Source: Norma Jacob, editor, QUAKER ROOTS: THE STORY OF
     WESTERN QUARTERLY MEETING OF PHILADELPHIA YEARLY MEETING OF
     THE RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (Kennett Square, Pa.:
     Graphics Standard, Inc, 1980), 2.

     William Penn laid out Street Road (PA926) in a straight line
     to connect a number of Quaker communities.

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1684 Source: Norma Jacob, editor, QUAKER ROOTS: THE STORY OF
     WESTERN QUARTERLY MEETING OF PHILADELPHIA YEARLY MEETING OF
     THE RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (Kennett Square, Pa.:
     Graphics Standard, Inc, 1980), 4.

     William Penn was forced to return to England in 1684 to
     settle the boundary dispute with Lord Baltimore, who
     controlled Maryland.

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1685 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 72.

     A second Chester county courthouse plus a prison were built
     in Chester in 1685.

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1711 Source: County Government and Archives in Pennsylvania,
     prepared by the Pennsylvania Historical Survey, Commonwealth
     of Pennsylvania, 1947. p52 

     The County Commissioners were created in 1711 to relieve the
     courts of some taxation duties and became the "chief
     Assessing authorities".

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1724 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 72.

     A third Chester county courthouse was constructed in Chester
     in 1724. 

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1760 Source: County Government and Archives in Pennsylvania,
     prepared by the Pennsylvania Historical Survey, Commonwealth
     of Pennsylvania, 1947. p52

     "Provision for the election of local Assessors was made as
     early as 1760" ( 1760,VI St. at L. sec. 3), (1835 P.L. 46
     sec. 8)

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1766 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 72.

     As early as 1766, there were complaints about the location
     of the courthouse at the extreme eastern end of the county,
     which was inaccessible to residents at the western end. 
     Public opinion divided into two groups, the "removalists"
     and the "non-removalists."

--------------------------------------
1780 Source: County Government and Archives in Pennsylvania,
     prepared by the Pennsylvania Historical Survey, Commonwealth
     of Pennsylvania, 1947. p52 

     The office of County Assessor was abolished in 1780.

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1780 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 72.

     In 1780, the state assembly gave permission to move the
     courthouse.  A piece of land was purchased in what was known
     at the time as "West Downington."

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1784/05/01     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 73.

     In 1784, the Assembly authorized construction of buildings
     "not at a greater distance than one mile and a half from the
     Turk's Head tavern in the township of Goshen, and to the
     west or southwest of said Turk's Head Tavern."  This
     prevented Downingtown from becoming the county seat.

     Land was purchased on 1 May 1784 from Benjamin Trego of
     Goshen and work began immediately on a courthouse and jail.

--------------------------------------
1785/03/30     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 73.

     First the winter delayed construction of the court house in
     West Chester, and then the non-removalists succeeded in
     convincing the state assembly to halt construction on 30
     March 1785.  A group from Chester under the leadership of
     Major John Harper went to Turk's Head to destroy the
     unfinished buildings ("Harper's invasion).  A group from
     Turk's Head, under the leadership of Colonel Hannum, Colonel
     Isaac Taylor and Mr. Marshall, gathered ammunition and
     provisions and surrounded the unfinished buildings to defend
     them.  The unfinished building was fortified and the men
     took positions with muskets.  Marshall and Taylor commanded
     the upper story while Underwood and Patton commanded the
     lower story.  Hannum directed the entire operation.

p74  The non-removalists spent the night at the "General Greene"
     and reached Turk's Head early in the morning.  They set up
     their cannon about 200 yards southeast of the Quaker Meeting
     House, but were reluctant to begin firing.  After several
     hours, "some pacific people" convinced both sides to
     withdraw without bloodshed, so the non-removalist cannon
     were redirected and fired in celebration of the treaty.  At
     the next session of the state assembly, the Suspension Act
     was repealed and construction continued.

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1786/11/28     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 75.

     In September 1786, prisoners were moved to the new jail, and
     on 28 November 1786, the first court session opened in West
     Chester.  

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1789 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 75.

     The people of Chester used the new courthouse in West
     Chester until 1789, but complained about the distance to
     travel and the "poor conditions of entertainment."  In 1789,
     the state assembly authorized the creation of Delaware
     county from the eastern portion of Chester County, with
     Chester as its county seat.  They defined the boundary
     between the two counties with a complicated formula that
     used the Brandywine Creek from the Delaware state line as
     far as Chadd's Ford, then zigzagged northeast so as not to
     divide anyone's property, passed to the north of Newtown,
     Edgemont and Radnor townships (included in Delaware County)
     until it met the Montgomery County line.  .

p76  One bizarre consequence of using the Brandywine Creek to
     define the boundary was a small piece of land bounded by the
     Creek and the Delaware State line (between US202 and PA100). 
     Legally, it belongs to Birmingham Township in Chester
     County, but it is completely cut off by Birmingham Township,
     Delaware County.

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1794 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "The Gazette"
     (1794)

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1797 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "The Literary
     Museum" (1797)

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1798/04/01     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 92.

     The first post office in the county was established at
     Downingtown on 1 April 1798, under postmaster Hunt Downing.

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1799 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 21.

     The first fire companies in West Chester were the West
     Chester Fire Company, founded 1799

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1799 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 31.

     "West Chester.--Located in the eastern part of the county,
     it was incorporated in 1799 and was originally called
     "Turk's Head." 

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1799 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 19.

     On 20 March 1799, the town of West Chester was elevated to a
     borough.

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1800s     Source: Frazier, E. Franklin,  BLACK BOURGEOISIE: THE
          RISE OF A NEW MIDDLE CLASS  (New York: The Free
          Press,1957), 14.

     Many free Negroes obtained freedom by being permitted to
     "hire their time" and work as "semi-free" laborers.  With
     the money earned from this, they were able to buy their
     freedom.

--------------------------------------
1800 Source: Heathcote, Charles William.  "History of Chester
     County Pennsylvania" (West Chester, PA: Horace F.  Temple,
     1926), 215-216.

     In 1800, the present site of Coatesville was a small cluster
     of houses and shops, known as Bridge Town.  Much of the land
     was owned by Moses Coates.  His grandfather (also Moses
     Coates) had emigrated there in 1717.  His grandfather had
     been an Irish Quaker.

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1802 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
     People (Chicago and New York: The Union History Company,
     1898), 884.

     A small market was built behind the public buildings in West
     Chester in 1802, but it was not very successful because
     merchants preferred to visit their customers at home.  (JJ:
     probably using wagons)  The town built a bigger market on
     Market Street in 1831 and enlarged it several times in the
     subsequent 20-25 years.

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1804/01/01     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 92.

     The West Chester post office was established on 1 January
     1804.  

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1805 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 23.

     West Chester's first criminal execution, of a black woman
     named Hannah Miller, took place in 1805

--------------------------------------
1809 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "Chester and
     Delaware Federalist" (1809)

--------------------------------------
1812 Source: Heathcote, Charles William.  "History of Chester
     County Pennsylvania" (West Chester, PA: Horace F.  Temple,
     1926), 215-216.

     1812 - The Coatesville post office was created in 1812 and
     Moses Coates became the first postmaster.

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1814 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 28.

     The Bank of West Chester was founded in 1814 on High Street
     almost directly across from the court house.

--------------------------------------
1818 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "Village
     Record" (1818)

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1823 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 28.

     West Chester received its first sidewalks in 1823.  They
     were made of brick.  The first MacAdam streets were laid in
     1829-1830.

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1823 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
     People (Chicago and New York: The Union History Company,
     1898), 885.

     In 1823, the town began to systematically lay brick
     sidewalks.

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1827 Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF CHESTER
     COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES,
     Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881)  p359

     In 1827, the Legislature authorized canal commissioners to
     make examinations through Chester and Lancaster Counties for
     a railroad to connect with the Pennsylvania Canal.  In 1828,
     these commissioners were directed to locate and put under
     contract a railroad through Chester County via Lancaster to
     Columbia.

--------------------------------------
1829-1830 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and
          its People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 885.

     In 1829 and 1830, Gay and Church Streets in West Chester
     were paved for the first time.

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1830 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 23.

     West Chester's second criminal execution, of a black man
     named Edward Williams, took place in 1830.

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1830/12/11     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     A public meeting was held at the Turk's Head Hotel on Dec.
     11, 1830 concerning the building of West Chester's first
     railroad.

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1830/12/22     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     A second public meeting was held on Dec. 22, 1830 to discuss
     the possibility of building a railroad to West Chester. 
     Joseph Wilson was appointed engineer to investigate
     possibilities.  Judge Izaak Darlington presided at both
     meetings.

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1830/12/24     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On December 24, 1830, a third public meeting concerning a
     West Chester railroad link resolved to construct a railway
     from WC to intersect with the Columbia Railway line, and
     chose Dr. William Darlington to head the local committee.

--------------------------------------
1831 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
     People (Chicago and New York: The Union History Company,
     1898), 884.

     West Chester built a bigger market on Market Street in 1831
     and enlarged it several times in the subsequent 20-25 years.

--------------------------------------
1831/01/08     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On January 8, 1831, John (or Joseph) Wilson presented a
     satisfactory route approved by the committee.  The estimated
     cost was $88, 021.29  A charter was obtained on July 18
     1831.  It was the first rr charter granted by the state
     which was carried into effect.

--------------------------------------
1831/03/28     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 2, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On the 28 March, 1831, a board of directors was elected for
     the West Chester Railroad.  John (or Joseph) Wilson was
     appointed the chief engineer.  By May 26, the contracts were
     let for grading the surface in mile-length sections.

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1832/09/18     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 2, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     At a board meeting on Sept. 18, 1832, it was announced by
     John Baily that the entire nine-mile track would be
     completed within sixteen months.

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1833 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 21.

     The second fire company in West Chester, the Good Will Fire
     company, was founded in 1833.

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1833/10/18     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 4, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The first track superintendent was J. Lacey Darlington, who
     was paid $1.00 daily.

     On Oct. 18, 1833, the PA Canal Commission completed a
     railroad line to the head of the inclined planes, located
     four miles from Philadelphia on the other side of the
     Schulkyll.  Passengers were conveyed the rest of the way by
     stages.

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1834 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 23.

     West Chester's third criminal execution, of a black man
     named Charles Bowman, took place in 1834.

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1837 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 32.

     Illustration: engraved picture showing the intersection of
     High and Market Streets in 1837. (Courtesy of the National
     Bank of Chester County)  JJ: It appears to show the
     courthouse on the left, with a clock tower and weather vane
     similar to the present one.  That makes me think that this
     picture must be of the view towards the north.  However, it
     must be the old courthouse, since this picture is dated
     earlier than 1846 (see notes from p76).  Note the use of
     stone slabs to provide a pedestrian crossing at the
     intersection of the dirt streets.

--------------------------------------
1837 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The Chester County Bank lost half of its capital in the
     general crash of 1837.  As a consequence, the West Chester
     Railroad suffered major losses and fell heavily in debt.

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1838 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 21.

     The third fire company in West Chester, the Fame Fire
     Company, was founded in 1838.

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1838 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
     People (Chicago and New York: The Union History Company,
     1898), 884.

     The West Chester street plan expanded in 1838 to include
     land north of the Matlack property on the north side; beyond
     the "old Turk's Head or Patton estate" on the east side, and
     beyond John Rutter's land on the northwest.

--------------------------------------
1839 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     No dividends were paid to West Chester Railroad stockholders
     during 1839.  The stockholders were not happy.  The West
     Chester Railroad did receive some breaks from the state on
     toll rates for use on the Columbia Road.  The directors were
     apparently maligned by the Directors.  Since its inception,
     the West Chester Railroad paid the state $30, 000 in tolls.

--------------------------------------
1842-1910 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER
          COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F.
          Temple, 1926), 108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "The
     Jeffersonian" (1842-1910) 

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1844/01/15     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     At the annual meeting of the West Chester Railroad directors
     on January 15, 1844, a new board of directors appointed
     Philip P. Sharples and Dr. Isaac Thomas as an executive
     committee.  Sharples become obsessed by railroad matters.

--------------------------------------
1844/01/31     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     1/31/1844, the Executive Committee of Philip P. Sharples and
     Dr. Isaac Thomas as an executive appointed Samuel M. Penten
     as the superintendent of the West Chester Railroad.

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1844/05/25     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     An agreement was reached with Canal Commission for a rate of
     $15 a train for running from the West Chester intersection
     of the Columbia-Philadelphia Railroad to the inclined plane. 
     It started operating on 5/25/1844.  Two second-hand 8-
     wheeled passenger cars were bought for service.  Then two
     new cars were commissioned from the W.E. Allison Company. 
     The baggage on these cars was carried beneath the seat.

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1845 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 23.

     West Chester's fourth criminal execution, and the first of a
     white man, named Jabez Boyd, took place in 1845.

--------------------------------------
1845/05/26     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On May 26, 1845, the Canal Commission agreed to haul West
     Chester Railroad trains for only $6000 annually.  (JJ: that
     is 400 trains at the 1844 rate.  Was it actually an
     increase?  Was it due to the introduction of steam
     locomotives?)  Philip Sharples reported completed contracts
     for relaying for the junction from West Chester to the
     junction.  

--------------------------------------
1846 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 75.

     The original West Chester court house was used until 1846
     when the present courthouse was built.

--------------------------------------
1847 Source: Jackson, Luther Porter,  FREE NEGRO LABOR & PROPERTY
     HOLDING IN VIRGINIA, 1830-1860.  (New York: Antheneum,
     1969), 155

     In 1847, Alexandria was pulled away from the District of
     Columbia and became part of the state of Virginia.  Many
     land holding free Negroes after this annexation became
     disillusioned by the "obnoctious" laws of Virginia.  For
     this reason, many free Negroes migrated to Washington D.C.
     and northern cities.

--------------------------------------
1851 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 23.

     West Chester's fifth criminal execution, and the second of a
     white man, named George Pharaoh, took place in 1851.

--------------------------------------
1855s/mid Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and
          its People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 468.

     Robert F. Hoopes was the Chester County Recorder of Deeds
     from 1854/11/10 to 1857/11/09.

--------------------------------------
1857 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
     People (Chicago and New York: The Union History Company,
     1898), 885.

     By 1857, almost all of the sidewalks in West Chester were
     bricked, and its streets were much improved.

--------------------------------------
1857/08/01     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The Pennsylvania Company bought the rights to the state
     railroads and canals at auction on August 1, 1857.

--------------------------------------
1859 Source: "Announcement: Nominee for Recorder of Deeds" in
     "Daily Local News," (West Chester:September 7, 1886)

      
     Sharpless M. Paxson moved to West Chester in 1859 at the age
     of 12. He stayed for the rest of his life.

--------------------------------------
1860s     Source: Frazier, E. Franklin,  BLACK BOURGEOISIE: THE
          RISE OF A NEW MIDDLE CLASS  (New York: The Free
          Press,1957), 136

     Many slaveholders set up seperate residences for their black
     mistresses and some even lived with them monogamously since
     marriage between the races was illegal..  ( Could be the
     reason why Moses Hepbuirn's white father is not in the
     Alexandria censuses in the early 1800s, becasue if he was
     monogomous he would not qualify for the census since you had
     to be the head of a household.)

--------------------------------------
1860-1865 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and
          its People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 345 & 347.

     Chester County underground railway agents included Norris
     Maris (perhaps B53-3 in FBS) of West Vincent Township.

p347 In West Chester, George Maris (perhaps B53-11) acted as the
     local underground railway agent when he was a young man:
     "who, as a lad, drew many a map of the road from there to
     Elijah F. Pennypacker's place" (near Phoenixville).

--------------------------------------
1861/08/23     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 108.

     "The Jeffersonian" (1842-1910) was one of only a few
     northern papers that supported the South during the civil
     war.  A mob attacked its office and partially wrecked it (no
     date given).  On 23 August 1861, US Marshall William
     Millward ordered the newspaper closed, but after a protest
     and lawsuit, the newspaper was allowed to reopen on 26
     October 1861.  The Postmaster General Blair barred "The
     Jeffersonian" from using the mails to distribute its issues,
     but it continued in operation until 1910.

--------------------------------------
1862 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
     People (Chicago and New York: The Union History Company,
     1898), 290.

     The population of Chester County was 77,000, and the
     population of the state of Pennsylvania was 2,900,000 in
     1862 when Lincoln instituted the military draft during the
     civil war.  (What this 1898 book calls the "war of the
     rebellion.")

--------------------------------------
1863/03/01     Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County
               Pennsylvania and its People (Chicago and New York:
               The Union History Company, 1898), 294.

     Black soldiers were drafted for the first time in the USA on
     1863/03/01.

--------------------------------------
1866 
NOTE W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its People
     (Chicago an    Source: ork: The Union History Company,
                    1898), 977.

     In 1865 or 1866, George B. Thomas joined the firm and the
     name changed to "Hoopes Brothers & Thomas."

--------------------------------------
1867 Source: Heathcote, Charles William.  "History of Chester
     County Pennsylvania" (West Chester, PA: Horace F.  Temple,
     1926), 215-216.

     1867 - Coatesville became a borough.  First election of
     officers: William B.  Morrison, Abram Gibbons, Craig
     Ridgeway, Richard Strode, William T.  hunt, Joseph Suydam.

--------------------------------------
1870 Source: "Announcement: Nominee for Recorder of Deeds" in
     "Daily Local News," (West Chester:September 7, 1886)

      
     Sharpless M. Paxson began to work in the West Chester
     Recorder's office in 1870.  He was a staunch Republican

--------------------------------------
1872 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "The Daily
     Local News" (1872).

--------------------------------------
1874-1888 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and
          its People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 967.

     Josiah Hoopes served as the recording secretary of the
     Chester County Agricultural Society from 1874-1888 (JJ: His
     mother died in 1887; father died in 1888).  The CCAS
     disappeared in 1895 when the West Chester State Normal
     School purchased the fairgrounds and declined to hold the
     annual agricultural fair.

--------------------------------------
1876/09/28     Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY
               OF CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA:WITH GENEALOGICAL
               AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (Philadelphia: Louis H
               Everts, 1881), 373.

     Prior to Sharpless M. Paxson, the office of Recorder of
     Deeds was held by a man named Edwin Bateman.  Bateman died
     on August 28th, 1876.  Paxson was his highest ranking
     subordinate at the time, so he was appointed to fill the
     position until January of 1878.  (Note that normally, this
     was an elected position.

--------------------------------------
1882/04/04     Source: Chester County Civil Court Docket #76290,
               79.

     F.A. Tencate Esq., Cashier of the Phoenixville Iron Works,
     brings a suit to civil court against John Diamond regarding
     a rental property in Cottage Row (#?).  The suit contends
     that rent is due and unpaid by the defendant John Diamond in
     the amount of $31.50.  A summons was issued 1882/04/08, with
     a judgment rendered in favor of Phoenixville  Iron Works. 
     John Diamond was ordered to give up peaceable possession of
     said premises and the sum of $31.50, plus $1.92 as cost of
     the suit.

--------------------------------------
1882/04/11     Source: Chester County Civil Court Docket #76290,
               81.

     F.A. Tencate Esq., Cashier of the Phoenixville Iron Works,
     brings a suit to civil court against Michael Connily
     regarding a rental property in Puddler's Row (#?).  The suit
     contends that rent is due and unpaid by the defendant
     Michael Connily in the amount of $61.31.  A summons was
     issued 1882/04/15 at 10 A.M.  Whereabouts of the tenant are
     unknown, having moved away 1882/04/12, according to the
     Constable.  A judgment was rendered in favor of Phoenixville 
     Iron Works.  Defendant Connily was found to be indebted to
     said corporation in the sum of $61.31, plus $1.97 as cost of
     the suit.

--------------------------------------
1882/04/17     Source: Chester County Civil Court Docket #76290,
               82.

     F.A. Tencate Esq., Cashier of the Phoenixville Iron Works,
     brings a suit to civil court against John McAdams regarding
     a rental property in Puddlers" Row (#?).  The suit contends
     that rent is due and unpaid by the defendant John McAdams in
     the amount of $31.12.  A summons was issued 1882/04/17,
     retrievable 1882/04/22 at 10 A.M.  A judgment was entered
     that the defendant delivered up peaceable possession of said
     premises and the sum of $31.12, plus $1.77 as cost of the
     suit.

--------------------------------------
1882/04/28     Source: Chester County Civil Court Docket #76290,
               82.

     F.A. Tencate Esq., Cashier of the Phoenixville Iron Works,
     brings a suit to civil court against Michael Keenan
     regarding a rental property in Puddler's Row (#?).  The suit
     contends that rent is due and unpaid by the defendant John
     McAdams in the amount of $16.72.  A summons was issued
     1882/04/28, retrievable 1882/05/03.  A judgment was rendered
     in favor of Phoenixville  Iron Works.  Defendant Keenan was
     ordered to give up peaceable possession of said premises and
     the sum of $16.72, plus $1.77 as cost of the suit. 

--------------------------------------
1882/04/28     Source: Chester County Civil Court Docket #76290,
               83.

     F.A. Tencate Esq., Cashier of the Phoenixville Iron Works,
     brings a suit to civil court against Thomas McAnnay
     regarding a rental property in Puddlers" Row (#?).  The suit
     contends that rent is due and unpaid by the defendant Thomas
     McAnnay in the amount of $14.24.  A summons was issued
     1882/04/28, retrievable 1882/05/03.  A judgment was rendered
     in favor of Phoenixville  Iron Works.  Defendant McAnnay was
     ordered to give up peaceable possession of said premises and
     the sum of $14.24, plus $2.02 as cost of the suit.

--------------------------------------
1882/03/07     Source: Chester County Civil Court Docket #76290,
               117.

     James Halt, agent for the Phoenixville Iron Works, brings a
     suit to civil court against David Signett regarding a rental
     property at #22 Frame Row.  A summons was issued 1882/03/07,
     retrievable 1882/03/12.  The suit was discontinued, with no
     further information listed.

--------------------------------------
1882/03/07     Source: Chester County Civil Court Docket #76290,
               117.

     James Halt, agent for the Phoenixville Iron Works, brings a
     suit to civil court against James Doran regarding a rental
     property at #5 Red Row.  A summons was issued 1882/03/07,
     retrievable 1882/03/12.  The suit was discontinued, with no
     further information listed.

--------------------------------------
1887-1890 Source: "Obituary of Sharpless M. Paxson" in "Daily
          Local News," (West Chester: May 5, 1930).

     In tribute form: they said of Sharpless M. Paxson,     
     "filled with credit the office of Recorder of Deeds of
     Chester County" particularly his excellent penmanship.  He
     was a "paragon of neatness and accuracy."

--------------------------------------
1887-1890 Source: "Obituary of Sharpless M. Paxson" in "Daily
          Local News," (West Chester: May 5, 1930)

     Sharpless M. Paxson was elected to a term as Recorder of
     Deeds from 1887 to 1890 following Richard H. Plank. 
     Sharpless M. Paxson was always a republican who remained
     "loyal to principles of the party."  

--------------------------------------
1889/02/13     Source: Daily Local News (February 13, 1889)
     
     Mrs. Lamborn, the woman who took care of the PRR station at
     North Matlack Street, reported to Officer Gheen that she had
     trouble with rowdy "colored" loiterers.

--------------------------------------
1890/12/10     Source: Daily Local News (December 10, 1890)
     
     Loitering at the PRR station was greatly reduced in recent
     weeks.

--------------------------------------
1891/09/03-1891/12/08    Source: Elizabeth M. McGlone vs. The
                         Phoenixville Iron Works in Chester
                         County Appearance Docket #55, 73.

     On 1891/09/03, Elizabeth M. McGlone filed a complaint in
     court against the Phoenixville Iron Works for the wrongful
     death of her husband, John McGlone.  The defendant,
     Phoenixville  Iron Works, pleads "Not Guilty" on 1891/09/23. 
     On 1891/11/09 it is agreed that Thomas M. Baldwin, Barclay
     Lear, and John D. Mullin shall act as arbiters, hearing the
     case 1891/12/07-08.

--------------------------------------
1891/09/03     Source: Plaintiff's Statement:  Elizabeth M.
               McGlone vs. The Phoenixville  Iron Works  

     In her statement, Elizabeth M. McGlone claims that her
     husband John McGlone was killed through negligence on the
     part of the defendant on 1891/06/25.  Elizabeth M. McGlone
     has two children, Joseph and Lizzie, the latter being
     between 15 and 16 years old and has been an invalid for 6
     years by reason of a spinal affliction.  This suit is
     brought on her behalf.

     John McGlone died as a result of a lift accident, which the
     plaintiff claims was of "extraordinary negligent and
     dangerous construction."  The lift was allowed to be run
     unoccupied as well as be operated by a boy aged under 14
     years.  Because of negligence and the fact that her family
     is now deprived of their support, Elizabeth M. McGlone is
     bringing suit against Phoenixville Iron Works for damages in
     the amount of $10,000.

--------------------------------------
1892/03/30     Source: Daily Local News" (March 30, 1892)

     John J. Pinkerton was the attorney for the PRR.

--------------------------------------
1892/08/01     Source: Plaintiff's Statement: Mary Steinberger
               vs. The Phoenixville Iron Works  

     In the statement, it is noted that Mary Steinberger has two
     children, John B. Jr., 3 years, and Sarah, age 3 weeks.  It
     is claimed that Mary has suffered the loss of her husband
     who was "constantly earning and in receipt of good wages,
     supporting and providing said plaintiff and her children and
     affording them a comfortable livelihood and maintenance." 
     Suit is brought for damages in the amount of $20,000.

--------------------------------------
1892/09/02     Source: "What I Saw at the Station at West
               Chester" reprinted from the "Pottstown Ledger" of
               Wednesday, in "Daily Local News" (September 2,
               1892).

This article describes the procession of people who used the
water cooler at the PRR station, including local leaders.  

--------------------------------------
1892/late Source: "Obituary of Sharpless M. Paxson" in "Daily
          Local News," (West Chester: May 5, 1930)

     During the Homestead Riots near Pittsburgh, PA in the early
     1890s (JJ: the strike at the Homestead Coal mines began June
     20, 1892), Sharpless M. Paxson led the members of company I,
     6th regiment National Guard of Pennsylvania in the coal
     districts of the state and remained on duty throughout
     insurrection.

--------------------------------------
1892/01/20     Source: Daily Local News (January 20, 1892)
     
     After the borough of West Chester decided to extend East
     Nields Street past the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks to the
     borough line at Bolmar Street, a jury awarded damages of
     $300 to A. D. Sharples and $105 to Pennsylvania Railroad.

--------------------------------------
1892/10/26     Source: "Daily Local News" (October 26, 1892)

     Following a lawsuit initiated by his wife, John Doran was
     declared to be a lunatic even though he was not present at
     the trial.  John Doran was a street cleaner for West Chester
     who managed to save his money and acquire a small fortune
     (roughly $4000).  After his son James died of typhoid in
     1889, John Doran went to Nebraska in 1891, then returned to
     get half of his money and left for Nebraska again, leaving
     the rents from his properties to support his wife.  She
     engaged a lawyer, Robert E. Monaghan, to have her husband
     declared incompetent before he could take anymore of his
     money away.  Another lawyer, Wilmer W. MacElree, represented
     John Doran's interests, but several witnesses, including
     Doran's son Lawrence, declared that John Doran had begun to
     act strangely ever since his son James had died.  Only
     Thomas Furlong, a cousin of John Doran, testified on his
     behalf.

--------------------------------------
1893 Source: Pamphlet Laws: Laws of the General Assembly of the
     Commonwealth of Pennsylvania,  1893. 

     Act No. 281: This act ordered the Clerk of Orphans Court to
     be responsible for the registering of births and deaths in
     the county. The records must be updated semi-annually. It
     will be the duty of parents, guardians and all others
     involved to supply information concerning births and deaths
     to the Assessors who will collect and return the information
     to the Clerk of Orphans Court at the same time the Assessor
     returns his Assessments of property to the County
     Commissioner along with a written oath of authenticity. The
     County Commissioner will supply appropriate books to the
     Clerk of Orphans Court in which the information will be
     entered.

--------------------------------------
1893/02/28     Source: Daily Local News (February 28, 1893)
     
     After John Doran returned from Nebraska to defend himself,
     he was declared to be "not insane."  Doran accused his wife
     of plotting to take his money, and said that he had asked
     her to accompany him to Nebraska.

--------------------------------------
1893/05/01     Source: Daily Local News (December 20, 1893), in
               Chester County Historical Society.

     Starting on May 1, 1893 birth and death statistics were
     compiled twice a year by the Assessors, the first period
     covered May 1st to Oct. 30th and the second Nov. 1st to
    April 30th.

--------------------------------------
1893/12/20     Source: Daily Local News, Chester County
               Historical Society, West Chester, Pa., 1893/12/20.

     "In accordance with an act of the Legislature passed at its
     last sessions, a register will hereafter be kept of all
     births and deaths in Chester county. The precinct Assessors
     who make their rounds twice a year are required to make a
     return of all births and deaths and file it with the Clerk
     of the Courts. It is made the duty of the latter officer to
     prepare a book and keep a careful record of all these
     returns. This is the first day on which such returns are
     expected to be made, but they will come in at intervals as
     may suit the convenience of the Assessors."

--------------------------------------
1894/03/03     Source: Daily Local News (March 3, 1894)

     There was a penny scale at the train station, but it was out
     of order.  The author asked if this was due to something he
     observed some time ago, when a group of small boys put a
     single penny in the scale, and then each jumped on in place
     of the previous boy before the scale could reset.  In this
     way, they all got weighed for a single penny.

--------------------------------------
1895/03/18     Source: Daily Local News (March 18, 1895)

     This was a complaint about "colored" boys who loafed at the
     train station, used bad language and littered the floor with
     peanut shells.

--------------------------------------
1895/12/21     Source: Daily Local News, Chester County
               Historical Society, West Chester, Pa., 
               1895/12/21.

     Tax Assessors. The latter have many more duties now than
     formerly. Besides making a return of all taxable persons and
     all property subject to taxation and the number of persons
     liable to be called upon for military service, as formerly,
     they have now to make return of all births and deaths, and
     next spring will have to make return of all children of
     school age. So far as the return of births and deaths are
     concerned the Assessors have first to show them in the
     Commissioner's Office and have the number taken account of
     an ele(l)ment in making up their pay, as they are paid a
     certain amount for each birth and death properly returned.
     The sheets on which they are tabulated are then filed with
     the Clerk of the Courts, whose duty it is to have them all
     recorded in a book or books kept for that purpose."  

--------------------------------------
1896 Source: "Obituary of Sharpless M. Paxson" in "Daily Local
     News," (West Chester: May 5, 1930)

     Sharpless M. Paxson served as the commander of the "Old
     Wayne Fencibles" Company I, Sixth Regiment.  He showed
     continued interest in the unit even after he became to old
     to remain active.  During the Spanish War, Company I went to
     field as a part of the US infantry.  Sharpless M. Paxson
     organized company M of the PA reserve guard "in order that
     the neighborhood might have protection while the gallant
     young men, many of whom he had trained, were out of town".

--------------------------------------
1897 Source: "Obituary of Sharpless M. Paxson" in "Daily Local
     News," (West Chester: May 5, 1930)

     Sharpless M. Paxson served as the captain of the Young men's
     Republican club "a marching organization" till 1897.

--------------------------------------
1898 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
     People (Chicago and New York: The Union History Company,
     1898), 349.

     "West Chester was known far and wide as being friendly to
     the slave ... it is largely for this reason that so many
     colored people have made and now make this city their home. 
     They now constitute about one fourth of the population, have
     a ward of the city practically all to themselves, and have
     had representatives in the Council."  (JJ: This was in 1898. 
     See population statistics from p484.)

--------------------------------------
1901/10/24     Source: Chester County Sheriff's Deed Book 14,
               167.

     Elisha G. Cloud sued Harry M. Burns for an unpaid debt and
     won.  As a result, Cloud was able to purchase the property
     at 390-392 East Nields Street including two houses, owned by
     Burns, for $1500.  

--------------------------------------
1901/12/16     Source: Daily Local News (December 17, 1901)
     
     Fire destroyed the "small one-story frame building on
     Franklin street south of Linden street, occupied for years
     by the late Patrick King and his wife Ellen."  The fire
     broke out at 10pm on 16 December.  An alarm was sounded from
     Box 33 at the corner of Matlack and Lacy Streets, and
     although it was too late to save the house, the Fame Fire
     company got a chance to practice with "its chemical cart."

     Mrs. King had left the previous Saturday for her former home
     in Dublin, Ireland, so she was not at home when the blaze
     broke out.  "It is supposed that the fire was caused by some
     of the boys of the southern portion of town.  Mrs. King had
     her own troubles with them and many of them have been
     previously arrested and fined by the Burgess for molesting
     her."

     The value of the house was estimated at $500 and the value
     of the furnishings at $100.

--------------------------------------
1905/11/23     Source: "Daily Local News" in Chester County
               Historical Society.

     J. Preston Thomas dies of illness.  Elected to the Directors
     of the Poor in 1887.  Graduate of Haverford College.  1870
     elected director of National Bank of Chester County.  V.P.
     of bank 1895/01/11, 1901/11/01 made President of Bank.  On
     Board of Trustees of the West Chester Normal School.  Helped
     found Chester County Hospital, and their Board of Mangers. 
     Member of the Downingtown Friends.  

--------------------------------------
1914/05/30     Source: "Profile Piece on Sharpless M. Paxson as
               Justice of the Peace" in "West Chester Star,"
               (West Chester: May 30, 1914)

     This article discussed Sharpless M. Paxson's role as a
     Justice of the Peace in West Chester.  It described him as
     having heard thousands of cases, and having earned respect
     for his impartiality in all matters.  His jurisdiction was
     both in the criminal and civil cases.  Before becoming
     Justice, he was in the office of Recorder of Deeds, and
     seved in the borough council.  The article siad that
     Sharpless M. Paxson was "still in his prime, (67) is fond of
     hunting, fishing and outdoor sports, and is one of our most
     wide awake and progressive citizens."

--------------------------------------
1915 Source: Heathcote, Charles William.  "History of Chester
     County Pennsylvania" (West Chester, PA: Horace F.  Temple,
     1926), 215-216.

     In 1915, Coatesville was chartered as a city.

--------------------------------------
1919/08/21     Source: "Notice of Sharpless Jr. acceptance into
               the Army" in "Daily Local News,"(West Chester:
               August 21, 1919)

     Sharpless Jr., who was living in Schnectady NY at the time,
     sent word to his father that he had been accepted into the
     "National Army from the empire state".  He menioned that his
     employers were not pleased with losing him, but he was
     willing to go.  However, he was sorry that he would not be
     going with the Pennsylvanians.

--------------------------------------
1926 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 31.

     The present population of West Chester is 13,409, is the
     county seat of Chester County.

--------------------------------------
1927/05/20     Source: Eightieth Birthday piece on Justice
               Paxson" in "Daily Local News," (West Chester: May
               20, 1927).

     Paxson's term as Justice of the Peace was to expire that
     year, but he wanted to continue in the role.  He was quoted
     as saying "There is one thing that I have always conceded,
     and that is when a person reaches that age of eighty years,
     I consider they are living on borrowed capital". 

--------------------------------------
1929/03/27     Source: Daily Local News (March 27, 1929)
     
     Twelve small boys who called themselves the "Riggtown Gang"
     went before West Chester Burgess George J. Brinton for
     stealing iron (including motorcycle parts) from a garage
     behind Frank Stancato's house on Lacy Street.  They were
     lectured and their parents were made to pay damages.

--------------------------------------
1930/05  
NOTE "Obituary of Sharpless M. Paxson" in "Daily Local News,"
     (West ChesterSource: , 1930)

     Sharpless M. Paxson was a life-long resident of West Chester
     who, even in later life, regarded as "one of the most
     energetic and aggressive of her elderly citizens."

--------------------------------------
1930/05/05     Source: "Obituary of Sharpless M. Paxson" in
               "Daily Local News," (West Chester: May 5, 1930)

     At his death in 1930, Sharpless M. Paxson owned extensive
     property, including a number of houses.  At one time, he
     owned most of the land North of Price Street, south of Union
     and west of Wayne.  (SEE ATTACHED MAP indicating size and
     location...)

--------------------------------------
1931/09/11     Source: "Roaring Oil Blaze Perils Crown Here;
               Three Are Injured" in DLN (September 12, 1931), 1
               & 10.

     This is the account of the "Goose Creek Fire" which spread
     from East Nields Street to asphalt tanks owned by the
     Bituminous Service Company at East Union Street and the PRR
     crossing.  The fire broke out at 6:50pm and burned for three
     hours.

     "A match, a cigarette or a spark from a brush fire falling
     on the usually placid waters of Goose Creek, a small stream
     running the length of the eastern end of town, set off the
     conflagratio.  The creek had an hour or so previously being
     (sic) transformed into a stream of oil when two 10,850
     gallon tanks at the Bituminous Company service year, fell
     from the supports and breaking, leaked into the water."

     "Frame houses on Magnolia street and a row of brick and
     frame houses on South Franklin street were seriously
     threatened by the fire.  Sparks also flew across the
     railroad to the coal shed of J. Leon Haggerty, the P. R. R.
     freight station and the lumber yard of Hoffman and Baldwin.

     "The buildings in greatest danger were those along the creek
     on South Franklin street.  Wooden fences bordering the
     stream were set ablaze and the fire worked towards the
     houses with unbelievable rapidity. ... Sparks, however, set
     fire to the rear kitchen roofs of the homes of Lawrence
     Hamilton, William Montgomery and Nathan Shur."  Nathan Shur
     (506 South Franklin Street) lost a small building at the
     rear of his house which housed 25-30 chickens.  

     NOTE: the article mentions "several airplanes [that] circled
     above the crowd and took pictures of the fire before
     darkness settled."  George J. Moses was the West Chester
     fire chief.

     Another small sidebar mentioned Jackie McCallin of 222 Lacey
     Street who owned a dog named Jonah.  Jonah fell into Goose
     Creek and got soaked with oil, so his owner had to keep him
     away from the fire.

     There was also a quotation by William Patton, colored, of
     307 South Franklin Street.

--------------------------------------
1944/08/05     Source: Daily Local News (August 5, 1944)

     Greenfield Park required many loads of fill in the swampy
     area around Goose Creek.  A local resident, Joseph Cotter,
     supervised the placement of truckloads of fill.  He
     constructed a small shack for his own use at the site, and
     marked it with a sign to "Keep Out" to deter local vandals.

--------------------------------------


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