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Notes on Thomas Thompson's
biography of Chris Sanderson

by Jim Jones

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[This first section contains a complete reference note for the book.]

Thomas Thompson, Chris: A biography of Christian C. Sanderson (Philadelphia, PA: Dorrance & Company, 1973), 420pp.
JJones collection

[This second section is a reproduction of the table of contents. It provides a framework into which we can "plug in" our notes.]

Preface                                                  pvii
Prologue                                                 pix
1. The Heritage                                          p1
2. "Breaking the Home Ties"                              p16
3. The Move to Sunnyside                                 p33
4. The Turn of the Century                               p55
5. A Senior at West Chester Normal School                p79
6. The Neophyte Teacher                                  p133
7. Chadds Ford                                           p148
8. Washington's Headquarters                             p169
9. World War I                                           p196
10. The Post War Years                                   p202
11. "The Stranger on the Sill"                           p215
12. Days at Elsmere                                      p237
13. The Depression                                       p259
14. The Return to Chadds Ford                            p299
15. "Death on Christmas Morning"                         p331
16. Rip's Encore                                         p353
17. The Rewarding Years                                  p368
18. The Final Farewell                                   p398
Index                                                    p409

========================== PAGE BREAK ===================

[This third and final section contains a second copy of the table of contents, with notes inserted in the correct places. Even though I may not complete the notes the first time I use the book, I can add more notes any time I want to.


Preface                                                  pvii

Prologue                                                 pix

1. The Heritage                                          p1

2. "Breaking the Home Ties"                              p16

p17  In a letter written at WCSNS to his parents and dated
     September 6, 1898, Sanderson wrote "I never got to sleep
     until 12 last night from the mosquiroes and bedbugs."  [JJ:
     If the mosquitoes were bad in room 238 of Old Main Hall,
     then think what they must have been like in Riggtown next to
     the swamp.]

p22  In a letter from his mother to Chris Sanderson (September
     26, 1898), the first tuition bill (at WCSNS) was $67.50.

p25  Chris Sanderson to "Mother & Brother" (WCSNS, October 9,
     1898).  "Last night they had a debate at society entitled
     `Which has the most brains--man or woman?'  Of course men
     stood up for men and women for women."
          "One man got and said that in geometry we find that the
     whole is greater than any of its parts.  Hence as Eve was
     made from Adam--man must be the greatest.  Another one says
     that a woman has more intellect to buy than a man when a boy
     jumped up.  He was Paul MacElree.  He said, `My old man must
     have brains or he couldn't get the money with which my
     mother buys things with.'"
          "Well, I must close as it is time for chapel.  The boy
     that loves you, C. Sanderson."

3. The Move to Sunnyside                                    p33

p34  Chris Sanderson to "Mother & Brother" (WCSNS, January 8,
     1899).  It was possible to telephone from Mike's [JJ:
     somewhere in Mont Clare or Phoenixville] to WCSNS for 15
     cents.

4. The Turn of the Century                                  p55

p67  Chris Sanderson to "Mother & Brother" (WCSNS, April 8,
     1900).  In a letter that described a bicycle trip from West
     Chester to Malvern and back, Sanderson mentioned that he
     took a spill in Malvern onto a road "made of limestone and
     when I got up, I was white dust from head to foot."

5. A Senior at West Chester Normal School                  p79

p84  Chris Sanderson to "Mother & Brother" (WCSNS, September 27,
     1900).  In a letter that mentioned the upcoming election,
     Sanderson asked for a photo of the Republican preisdential
     candidate, McKinley, so he could put it in his window with
     an electric light behind it.

p84  Chris Sanderson to "Mother & Brother" (WCSNS, October 2,
     1900).  This letter described the parade that accompanied
     the "great Republican meeting" in West Chester.  The parade
     was so large that it proceeded in two divisions.

p84  "Most of us stayed in a crowd, as soon as we hit High and
     Market Street, the uptown slobs began to yell Normal Grits
     at us."

p85  In the first division, there were the Chief Marshall, Col.
     H. H. Hooten of the 12th Pennsylvania Volunteers, the WC
     band, the WC Pioneers, the WC Republican Club, the Liberty
     Band of West Chester, the Colored Republicans Club of WC,
     Senator Snyder, McKinley, the Roosevelt CLub, the Malvern
     Fife and Drum Corps, the Malvern Republican Club, the
     Lincoln University Band and the Lincoln Republican Club.

p85  The second division included those groups whose trains
     arrived late: Phoenixville Military Band, Phoenixville
     Republican Club, Colored Pioneer Club of Phoenixville, the
     Downingtown Republican Club, ...
p86  ... the Parkesburg Republican Club, the Good Will Fife and
     Drum Corps, the Coatesville Republican Club, the Spring City
     Republican Club, and the Schuylkill Rough Riders.

p87  Chris Sanderson to "Mother & Brother" (WCSNS, October 9,
     1900).  Five students were expelled from the State Normal
     School.  Two Cubans were expelled for smoking, while two
     senior boys and one girl were expelled for "driving with
     Normal girls."

p90  Chris Sanderson to "Mother & Brother" (WCSNS, November 11,
     9, 1900).  The WCSNS altered its program by requiring
     students to complete four years instead of three to
     graduate.

p101 Mrs. R. M. Sanderson to Chris Sanderson (Port Providence,
     PA, January 10, 1901).  Mrs. Sanderson had her first ride in
     an automobile on this day, courtesy of the local doctor, who
     took her into town after he visited one of her neighbors. 
     She wrote "I did enjoy the drive so much--he has a lovely
     traveller."

p117 Chris Sanderson to "Mama & Brother" (WCSNS, September 27,
     1900).  The local Temperance Society offered $5 prizes to
     the best essays on Temperance by a junior and a senior at
     WCSNS.

p118 Mrs. R. M. Sanderson to Chris Sanderson (Port Providence,
     PA, April 7, 1901).  Mrs. Sanderson estimated that teaspoons
     like those used at WCSNS cost 33 cents a piece (three for a
     dollar).

p123 Mrs. R. M. Sanderson to Chris Sanderson (Port Providence,
     PA, May 18, 1901).  Mrs. Sanderson was offered the chance to
     get a home telephone, but it required at least three people
     in her neighborhood to subscribe.  Two neighbors, Mr. Anson
     and Charlie Connard, agreed to do so, but Mrs. Sanderson
     hesitated because the price was so high--ten dollars per
     year.

6. The Neophyte Teacher                                   p133

p133 Thomas Wallace to Chris Sanderson (Chadds Ford, June 6,
     1905).  Mr. Wallace was head of the Chadds Ford School.  He
     hired Sanderson as a school teacher for $45/month plus the
     services of a janitor.

7. Chadds Ford                                            p148

p151 Mrs. R. M. Sanderson to Chris Sanderson (Port Providence,
     PA, September 10, 1905).  Mrs. Sanderson described the
     unruly behavior of railroad passengers on the train she took
     from West Chester to Phoenixville.  "Either West Chester's
     influence is most terrible or else the men of Phoenixville
     are more depraved than most men.  I don't know, but sure it
     is that a tougher crowd it has never been my lot to get into
     than was on the train last night.  Drunken men, fighting,
     the most fearful language I ever listened to . . . went
     through the train until we found seats [in] another car."

p163 Chris Sanderson to "My dear Mother," (Chadds Ford, PA, March
     27, 1906).  Sanderson urged his mother to move in with him
     in the old Washington's Headquarters house of the Battle of
     Brandywine in Chadds Fords.  He wrote that the monthly rent
     was $6-7 and that he was used to paying $18/month for board. 
     He calculated that, if they kept chickens and grew
     vegetables, he could reduce the cost of his board to
     $10/month.

p163 Mrs. R. M. Sanderson to Chris Sanderson (Phoenixville, PA,
     April 3, 1906).  Mrs. Sanderson wrote that she had begun to
     rent the house of "Soph" at 303 Bridge Street in
     Phoenixville, for $6/month.

8. Washington's Headquarters                               p169

9. World War I                                             p196

10. The Post War Years                                     p202

p206 In 1920, Sanderson accepted a position as principal and
     teacher at the Glen Mills School for $111.25/month.

11. "The Stranger on the Sill"                             p215

p223 Sanderson was appointed as principal of the Glen Mills
     School in Delaware County with a monthly salary of $120.

p224 Sanderson made his first radio broadcast on station WF1 at
     the radio station operated by Strawbridge and Clothier in
     Philadelphia.  "Radios in those days were few."

p231 In July 1924, Sanderson led a Boy Scout trip that covered
     626 miles, mostly by hitchhiking.

12. Days at Elsmere                                        p237

p239 Mrs. Sanderson lived in West Chester where, to augment her
     son's meager income, she strung tags for the Denney Tag
     Company on West Barnard Street.  In a letter, Mrs. R. M.
     Sanderson to Chris Sanderson (West Chester, PA, February 8
     1926), she wrote "[Roy from Chicago] begged me not to do no
     more tags, but nevertheless, I got two thousand today."  

13. The Depression                                         p259

p290 Sanderson calculated his total income for the year 1935 as
     $1068.46.  This was the wage of someone living in poverty.

14. The Return to Chadds Ford                              p299

p330 During World War II, many people and organizations created
     "service flags" with stars representing people who were
     serving in the military.  Each flag had its own dedication
     ceremony.

15. "Death on Christmas Morning"                           p331

16. Rip's Encore                                           p353

17. The Rewarding Years                                    p368

18. The Final Farewell                                     p398

Index                                                      p409

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Copyright 2010 by Dr. James A. Jones