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Notes on the Denney Tag Company, 1884-1991

compiled by Jim Jones

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This file contains assorted facts from West Chester history collected for the HIS480 "Computer methods of historical research" class at West Chester University. Each fact consists of specific information, a reference note to its source, and a date. The "facts" are organized in chronological order.

Collected by Jim Jones and Kelly McVeigh (Spring 1997), with special thanks to David Peirce of the Denney-Reyburn Company. Last edited by Jim Jones (January 15, 1998).


1884
"Denney Tag among first borough industries" in Daily Local News (May 4, 1991), A8.

This article gives a brief history of the Denney Tag Company and mentions that, when Samuel L. Denney first founded it in Philadelphia, its main customer for tags was the Wanamaker department store chain.

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1884
"City of Philadelphia--Leading Merchants and Manufacturers" in Pennsylvania Historical Review (Historical Publishing Company, 1886), 99.

The Denney Tag Company was founded by two brothers, S. L. and H. Denney, in 1884. By 1886, they were located in a factory at 114 South Second Street, with two floors each 20x100 feet. They made tough paper string tags, pin labels (used in the clothing industry). They employ ten workers.

The Denney brothers were Pennsylvania natives who moved to Philadelphia a few years earlier. They invented and built all of their own machinery.

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1887/08/12
West Chester Star (May 30, 1914) from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company company was the second oldest tag printing firm in the country. It was founded in Philadelphia, but moved early to West Chester, where it was incorporated on August 12, 1887.

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1887
From David L. Peirce notes.

Neighbors in West Chester had to be reassured that the Denney Tag Company factory would not disrupt their neighborhood.

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1888
Lillian Temple Scott, "Recalls Centennial Days" in Daily Local News (September 24, 1949), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

In a letter to the newspaper, Mrs. Lillian Temple Scott, a retired bookkeeper of the Denney Tag Company, recalled her job as the first bookkeeper at Samuel L. Denney's tag company. In March 1888, two weeks before the company moved to West Chester, she remembered being tied up in the company's Philadelphia office at 917-919 Filbert Street.

"I used to . . . go to the second floor, perch on a high stool at a high desk, try to keep books, hand out tags to children and older persons to string, run errands, sweep down the stairs, and do other jobs that bookkeepers today would not do for the modest wage of one dollar per week that I received when I first started there. My salary was increased a little a few years later." [jj: salary]

She worked for Denney beginning in 1888, and was born on September 26, 1863. She "left the plant after nine years to marry George R. Scott."

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1888/02/01
Daily Local News (February 1, 1888), from David L. Peirce notes.

Representatives of the Denney Tag Company of Filbert Street in Philadelphia visited West Chester to see if it offered a good location for their factory. They met with representatives of the West Chester Board of Trade.

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1888/02/03
From David L. Peirce notes based on original handwritten manuscript.

At a meeting of potential West Chester investors in the Denney Tag Compay, the following men were elected to offices, and the group voted to request a visit by members of a subcommittee to the tag company factory before they bought stock. Thomas Hoopes, president; H. P. Worth, secretary; members of the subcommittee: Thomas P. Worrall, Albert P. Hall, Mark H. Darlington.

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1888/02/03
Daily Local News (February 3, 1888), from David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company wanted to move to West Chester in order to expand its operation. At present, it employed twenty people, but hoped to employ forty. The company needed to raise $7000 to make the move, nd had already raised $2000 in West Chester.

Representatives of the West Chester stockholders, Marshall S. Way and A. P. Hall, visited Philadelphia and reported happily that the tag company employed "the better class of workmen, and the work itself is clean and the manufactury just such as the people of West Chester should be pleased to have established here."

The article argued that the creation of 40 jobs in West Chester would lead to a population increase of 150-200 people, and they would spend their salaries in West Chester, so everyone would benefit.

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1888/02/06
"May Locate in West Chester" in Chester Times (David L. Peirce notes).

The West Chester Board of Trade managed to get the Denney Tag Company to move its operations to West Chester, after winning out over the city of Chester. Citizens of West Chester subscribed to $2000 in shares in the company, which was expected to employ roughly 40 people.

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1888/02/06
From David L. Peirce notes.

Hoopes Brothers and Thomas nurseries ordered 30,000 tags from the Denney Tag Company.

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1888/02/08
From David L. Peirce notes based on original handwritten manuscript.

At the second meeting of potential West Chester investors in the Denney Tag Compay, the subcommittee was expanded to include Jerome B. Gray, Frank P. Darlington, Henry C. Baldwin, W. P. Sharpless. They also agreed to invite the officers of the Denney Tag company to visit West Chester.

The subcommittee recommended that the full committee raise their investment in the Denney Tag company to $9160, bringing the total stock issue to $20,000. In exchange, the investors would receive five positions on the board of directors, plus the treasurer's position.

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1888/02/10
From David L. Peirce notes based on original handwritten manuscript, written on Penn Mutual Fire Insurance Company stationary./

At a 7pm meeting of the special subcommittee of the Board of Trade, they agreed to the use of the school property on Barnard Street by the Denney Tag Company. The Philadelphia investors were represented by Mssrs. Denney, Witheraw and Harmer. Joseph W. Barnard was chosen to act as solicitor for the West Chester stockholders.

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1888/02/13
From David L. Peirce notes based on "report by Mark H. Darlington, Treasurer," original handwritten manuscript.

This is a list of the stockholders in the Denney Tag Company from outside of West Chester, and the number of shares that they owned. There were intended to be a total of 1250 shares at $20 each, for a capital issue of $25,000. The total number of shares was 597, which was worth $11, 940.

S. L. Denney (250), C. H. Voorhis (7), H. Denney (10), A. J. Withrow (40), H. Herman (10), C. H. Buckman (20), J. C. Witcher (8), J. C. Witcher for John C. Witcher (2), J. C. Witcher for Tom Witcher (2), Samuel O. Barber (5), S. N. Murphy (10), Thomas J. Fasnan? (10), William A. Hall (5), George W. Harmer (50), John Henderson (15), George N. Bigelord (50), James W. Doyle (25), S. L. Denney (30), Chas. Trout (5), Geo. Clothier (5), Wm. Ashuer? (10), W. H. Rife (15), James Moore (5), W. A. Church (5), Wm. A. Schull (5).

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1888/02/13
From David L. Peirce notes based on original handwritten manuscript.

At the first meeting of the new board of directors of the Denney Tag Company, Joseph W. Barnard (175 votes), Albert P. Hall (176), A. D. Sharpless (126), Plummer E. Jefferis (126), and Marshall S. Way (116) were elected to the board. Other nominees included Fred D. Reid (90 votes), William Scattergood (70), George Achilis/Achelis? (30) and Maurice R. Travilla (11).

Mark H. Darlington was the only nominee for treasurer.

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1888/02/14
"Report of the Committee to the Subscribers of the Capital Stock of the Denney Tag Company, West Chester, PA," from David L. Peirce notes.

After electing directors and choosing Mark Darlington as treasurer, the stockholders voted to move the company from Philadelphia to West Chester.

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1888/02/21
Daily Local News (February 21, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company placed a boiler and a small engine in the ground floor of the old Barnard Street school. Other machinery went on the third floor, while the business offices and packing/shipping department went on the second floor. They removed the back stairway to make room for an elevator.

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1888/02/28
Daily Local News (February 28, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company paid $3300 for the old Barnard Street School. The company was "overwhelmed" by the requests for employment.

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1888/03/10
Daily Local News (March 10, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

The Girard Fire Insurance Company of Philadelphia insured the new Denney Tag Company factory in West Chester.

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1888/03/26
Daily Local News (March 26, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company started operations at its West Chester plant.

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1888/04/20
Daily Local News (April 20, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

In order to entice the Denney Tag Company to move to West Chester, the Borough Council granted them (and any other firm that employed ten or more people) ten years of relief from Borough taxes.

Within four years, S. L. Denney had made his company into the second largest manufacturer of paper tags in the USA.

The capacity of the factory was 500,000 tags per day.

Description of tag-making: First, large rolls of paper were split into narrower bands, which were then rerolled and carried to the third floor by elevator for printing. Machines, each with a capacity of 100,000 tags/day, cut, trimmed, stamped and printed the tags. Women operated the machines and constructed the pasteboard boxes used to ship the finished tags.

Tags were strung with strin or wire by women or children who worked in their own homes. This work allowed them to earn money in the evening hours.

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1888/05/10
Daily Local News (May 10, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company employed 25 people.

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1888/05/24
From David L. Peirce notes based on "original handbook of M. Darlington."

This is the list of original shareholders in the Denney Tag company. It includes the name of each shareholder and in parentheses, the number of shares (@$20 each) that each person owned.

J. W. Barnard (5), A. D. Sharpless (10), A. P. Hall (5), Marshall Way (10), Plummer Jefferis (10), Mark H. Darlington (15), W. P. Sharpless (5), William Hoopes (10), William T. Shepherd (3), Francis Biddle (10), Jerome B. Gray (10), Samuel J. Parker (10), Edwin Darlington (10), Frank P. Darlington (5), Thomas P. Worrall (5), George Achelis (5), Edward H. Hall (20), Michael Farrell (5), Howard Hawley (5), George Achelis (5), Thomas Hoopes (5), E. P. Newlin (5), Thomas T. Smith (5), John Hall (10), Rees Palmer (5), Fred D. Reid (5), James Bros. (5), Maurice Travilla (5), William H. Hodgson (5), J. Newton Huston (1), Eber Woodward (5), Eli Palmer (5), Thomas C. Hogue (1), C. W. Talbot (5), Cha. E. Woodward (5), Sarah H. Dickinson (10), Samuel J. Lewis (1), Joseph S. Evans (5), H. C. Merdith/Meredith? (5), Fred T. Ingram (1), Sharpless Dutton (5), William Cloud (5), William Scattergood (5), E. S. Mendenhall (2), Ralston R. Hoopes (3), George Kerr (4), John W. Ramsey (5), Rupert & Philips (5), H. B. Buckwaiter/Buckwalter? (5), Davis Hause (1).

The total number of shares was 297, which represented $5940, at $20/share. Nonetheless, Peirce's notes suggest that shares worth a total of $8180 were sold, and includes an unclear reference that implies Wm. Hoopes bought 100 shares on May 24, 1888.

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1888/09/14
Daily Local News (September 14, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company announced a dividend to stockholders of eight percent, payable on or after October 1, 1888 at the office of the treasurer, Mark H. Darlington.

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1888/10/11
"Another Tag Factory" in Daily Local News (October 11, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

S. L. Denney and his brother-in-law, Mr. Gifford, announced their purchase of a grist and saw mill belonging to C. P. Dorman on the Northeast Creek near North East, MD. They planned to enlarge it and use it to manufacture tags.

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1888/11/14
Daily Local News (November 14, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

At a special Denney Tag Company stockholders' meeting, it was agreed to remove the word "Philadelphia" wherever it appeared in company documents and insert the phrase "West chester." They also agreed to reduce the number of directors from 13 to 9.

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1888/12/12
Daily Local News (December 12, 1888), From David L. Peirce notes.

A portion of the Denney Tag Company machinery was sent from West Chester to a new plant opened in Chicago, IL.

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1889
From David L. Peirce notes, based on old newspaper clipping in CCHS.

The Denney Tag Company received an order for 500,000 tags from Wanamakers department store of Philaelphia.

Samuel O. Barber was chosen as plant superintendent for the Denney Tag Company.

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1889/01/03
Daily Local News (January 3, 1889), From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company shipped 12 million tags last month. The new branch office in Chicago produced many new orders.

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1889/10/12
Daily Local News (October 12, 1889), From David L. Peirce notes.

At a directors' meeting of the Denney Tag Company, S. L. Denney was chosen as president, George W. Harmer as vice- president, Mark H. Darlington as treasurer and Samuel O. Barber as secretary.

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1889/10/17
Daily Local News (October 17, 1889), From David L. Peirce notes.

S. L. Denney announced his deaire to sell off the West Chester part of the Denney Tag Company and assume full control over the Chicago portion of the operation. It was expected that Elmer Edrdige of Johnston PA, who had friends in West Chester, would buy out Denney's share.

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1889/10/31
Daily Local News (November 11, 1889), From David L. Peirce notes.

S. L. Denney resigned as president of the Denney Tag Company of West Chester. He was replaced by C. W. Talbot, Esquire. S. O. Barber was chosen as plant superintendent. The company's business was unaffected.

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1890/02/20
From David L. Peirce notes.

At an auction held at the Turk's Head Tavern, the auctioneer sold some shares of Denney Tag stock at $3.25/share (par value $20) and withdrew five other shares after they recieved a highest bid of only $3.00.

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1890/10/09
From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company was at work on an order for eight million tags for the American Express Company of New York.

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1892
From David L. Peirce notes, based on old newspaper clipping in CCHS.

The Denney Tag Company received several orders for 500,000- 1,000,000 tags from Sydney, Australia.

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1892/08/31
"West Chester Pays Her Working Girls Low Wages, but Has Many Out Positions," in Daily Local News (August 8, 1892), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester History."

Saleslady in 1892 received from $2 - $3.00 per week and up to $6.00 per week. Wages for dressmakers decreased from $6 to $10.00 per week and to $6 to $4.00 per week due to "cheap work and an increase in the number..." Wages for women typewriters fell from $10 to $4-$6.00 per week. The Denney Tag Company pays the girl employees $3 to $6.00 per week.

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1892/09/07
From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag company held its annual stockholders meeting, and reported that business was good. They discussed the posibility of expanding the factory. A semi-annual dividend of 3% (60 cents per share) was distributed at the meeting.

The stockholders selected new directors of the company, including C. Wesley Talbot, George Harmer, Albert P. Hall, Edward H. Hall, Dr. Joseph P. Eldridge, Frank C. Biddle, A. D. Sharpless, S. O. Barber, and John E. Huey.

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1892/09/08
"Stringing Tags" in Daily Local News (September 8, 1892), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses-- Denney Tag."

"Many of the schoolchildren about town make many pennies in the course of the week through the generosity of the Denney Tag company, which gives them employment at stringing tags after they are printed. Every day scores of the children call at the plant and secure boxes of tags, which they string at their houses after school hours. It affords them employment during their leisure hours. The price paid is ten cents per 1,000 tags, each box containing that number."

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1893/07/14
Coatesville Weekly Times (July 14, 1893), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

The Denney Tag Company employs roughly 15 people and has a great deal of business.

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1893/12/23
Coatesville Weekly Times (December 23, 1893), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

Deputy Factory Inspector David McAvoy inspected the Denney Tag company factory and found an underaged employee, whom he removed.

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1894/02/09
From David L. Peirce notes.

S. L. Denney installed a new pin-tag printing machine in his Barnard Street factory. The new machine simultaneously printed each tag with two colors and punched it with a staple.

Samuel O. Barber was the plant superintendent.

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1894/06/11
Morning "West Chester Streets, Walnut Street."

Samuel O. Barber, the plant superintendent at Denney Tag Company, has bought one of the new houses on S. Walnut Street constructed by Reese Palmer near Barnard Street for $3500.

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1894/09/06
From David L. Peirce notes.

At the annual stockholders meeting of the Denney Tag Company, business was good and the new pin label machine was successful. William P. Sharpless replaced Dr. Joseph P. Eldridge as a director of the company.

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1894/10/08
From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company was busy filling an order for two million tags from Charleston SC. Workers started at 6:45am and worked until 9pm. They expected to be busy all winter.

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1894/10/11
"Stringing Tags" in Daily Local News (October 11, 1894), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses-- Denney Tag."

This is a short item about children who string tags for the Denney Tag company. It mentions that there are not enough tags available to satisfy the demand by the children. It also notes that children in Oxford earn money by wrapping caramels.

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1895/08/14
From David L. Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag company held its annual stockholders meeting, and reported that business was very good. A semi-annual dividend of 5% ($1 per share) was distributed at the meeting, and money was set aside for an emergency fund.

The company's directors included C. Wesley Talbot (president), George Harmer of Philadelphia (vp), Albert P. Hall of West Chester, A. D. Sharpless of West Chester, Edward H. Hall of West Chester, William P. Sharpless of West Chester, John E. Huey of Pennsbury, and Frank C. Biddle of Birmingham.

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1900/08/01
Daily Local News (August 1, 1900), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

School children used their winter school vacations to earn money by stringing tags for the Denney Tag company. "They receive seven cents a thousand and make a few cents every day by working actively and as time is not very precious to them, the diligent ones are earning enough to keep them supplied with spending money. Some will buy winter suits."

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1900/08/03
"New and More Styles Requests" in Daily Local News (August 3, 1908), from Peirce notes.

The tag industry began to chance as more styles of tags were introduced. At the beginning, tags were produced in a single style and either of two colors, nut by 1901, clients expended a wider choice. Many colors were available, each with printing in complementary colors. Strings also came in colors, while clients had a choice between copper, galvanized and plain iron wire.

At present, there were eight girls at work handstringing a type of tag that was too large to be sent out of the building for hand-stringing at home.

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1900/08/23
Daily Local News (August 23, 1900), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company announced a five percent dividend for the half-year. For a number of years in a row, the company has paid annual dividends of ten percent. Stockholders rarely ever offered to sell their stock shares.

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1900/11/13
"Samuel Corie Barber" in Daily Local News (November 15, 1900), in CCHS clippings file: "S. Barber."

Samuel Corie Barber was the father of Samuel O. Barber, the former superintendent of the Denney Tag company. He died on Tuesday at age 95.

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1900/12/04
Daily Local News (December 4, 1900), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company manufactured 4 million tags which were sold to a firm that supplied tag printers in Cincinnati, OH.

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1901/01/12
Daily Local News (January 12, 1901), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

The Denney Tag company ordered a new machine on a trial basis to string tags. The machine was said to have a capacity of 50,000 tags per day. For some time now, tags were "strung by the children or others whose time was of moderate value" for about ten cents per thousand.

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1901/02/18
from Peirce notes.

Although business is normally slow at this time of the year for the Denney Tag Company, the factory was still busy.

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1901/05/31
Daily Local News (May 31, 1901), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company was not very busy at the moment, so it occupied its staff in the manufacture of various small novelties including a small wool tag fastener and a sort of double wire fishhook used to hang meat.

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1901/06/19
Daily Local News (June 19, 1901), in CCHS clippings file "Keystone Tag Company."

The Keystone Tag Company firm leased the R.R. Hoopes warehouse building as the site for the new factory and machines and equipment were to be transferred from Lancaster to West Chester.

The firm operating the new manufacturing company is S. O. Barber and George K. McFarland, and will be managed by Harry Barber, the son of S. O. Barber. S. O. Barber was currently the Superintendent of the Denney Tag Company, one of the largest home stock holders, and had no plans to leave the Denney Tag Company, as the new factory was to assist the Denney Tag Company.

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1901/06/20
Daily Local News (June 20, 1901), from Peirce notes.

Acording to Denney Tag Company plant superintendent Samuel O. Barber, the firm is extremely busy. It filled orders ranging in size from 1000 to 4 million tags. At present, the Denney was making an order of 4 million tags for the state of Georgia to be used as tax tags by manufacturers.

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1901/08/14
Daily Local News (August 15, 1901), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

At a monthly meeting of the Denney Tag company board of directors, Samuel O. Barber was asked to resign from the board because he "purchased an interest in another tag company."

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1902/03
from Peirce notes.

Denney Tag Company's business boomed in 1902. In March 1902 alone, they produced over 5 million tags, up from 2 million in March 1901. The plant had more orders than it could fill.

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1902/05/05
from Peirce notes.

Frank P. Thomas of York PA, formerly of West Chester, returned to West Chester to take over the printing department at Denney Tag.

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1902/09/04
from Peirce notes.

At the annual stockholders meeting, Henry Baldwin presided while M. R. Travilla served as the secretary and H. J. Clouser assisted as teller. 69 stockholders voted 750 shares. ll members of the board were reelected except A. D. Sharpless, who was replaced by Burgess John Thorp. He joined Edwin Darlington, Albert P. Hall, Edward H. Hall, George W. Harmer (of Philadelphia), John E. Huey, William P. Sharpless, C. Wesley Talbot and M. S. Way.

President Talbot's report stated that the Denney Tag Company made over 57 million tags, 13.5 million deadlocks, and 7 million meat hooks during the previous year.

Thios produced the largest gross in the company's history. The board voted to pay an 8% semi-annual dividend and to place additional cash on reserve.

During the past year, the company paid out nearly $7,000 in salaries and $1139 "to the children who string and wire tags."

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1902/09/16
from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company factory was supervised by Charles W. Talbot (C. Wesley Talbot).

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1902/11/08
from Peirce notes.

John Thorp, director of the Denney Tag Company, resigned and at the regular director's meeting, they tried to replace him. The writer guessed that A. D. Sharpless would be reelected to the board.

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1902/11/10
from Peirce notes.

Ralph C. Barnes left his position at the Sharpless Separator Works to become the plant superintendent of the Denney Tag Company, replacing Charles L. Talbot, who resigned.

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1902/11/13
from Peirce notes.

The directors of the Denney Tag Company failed to meet yesterday because only one member--the president--showed up.

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1902/11/20
from Peirce notes.

A committee of the directors of the Denney Tag Company, composed of M. S. Way, W. P. Sharpless and E. H. Hall, met to find a replacement for Charles L. [JJ:W.?] Talbot, who resigned "to accept a more mucrative position."

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1902/12/13
from Peirce notes.

James T. Gault was named the new plant superintendent for the Denney Tag Company.

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1903/09/11
from Peirce notes.

At the annual stockholders meeting of the Denney Tag Company, there was no opposition to the old management. A. D. Sharpless, John E. Huey, Edwin B. Darlington, William P. Sharpless, and Albert P. Hall were all present. C. W. Talbot, M. S. Way, H. C. Baldwin, and George W. Harmer were absent. Harmer was reelected vice-president, Edwin Darlington was reelected president, William P. Sharpless became secretary and Mark W. Darlington became treasurer. James T. Gault was reaapointed plant manager and George Huey, bookkeeper.

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1904/08/31
from Peirce notes.

The board of the Denney Tag Company declared a semi-annual 5% dividend.

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1904/09/15
from

At the annual stockholders meeting of the Denney Tag Company, all of the old officers were reelected at the same salary.

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1905/03/10
from Peirce notes.

James T. Gault, plant superintendent for the Denney Tag Company, resigned due to poor health. The board unanimously agreed to appoint George Huey, assistant plant manager, to serve as the acting plant manager.

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1905/04/09
from Peirce notes.

The board of the Denney Tag Company appointed George Huey as plant manager.

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1905/07/19
from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company received a new patent machine for tag manufacturing. It should relieve bottlenecks that developed in recent years at the factory.

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1906/01/11
from Peirce notes.

The monthly directors meeting heard a report from plant superintendent George Huey stating that business had never been better. The company received orders from all over the world, and expected to add more machines in the near future.

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1906/05/12
Daily Chester Streets, Walnut Street."

Samuel O. Barber of S. High Street recently purchased the former E. E. Pierce house at the corner of Walnut and Lacey Streets for $4100. It was less than a year old, and it was attached to a similar house also built by Mr. Pierce.

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1906/08/23
from Peirce notes.

The directors of the Denney Tag Company declared a dividend of $1.20 per share (6%) and a special dividend of $0.80 per share (4%). That coupled with the last semi-annual dividend of 5%, brought to 15% the total dividend paid out in the last year.

C. W. Talbot resigned as director of the Denney Tag Company and was replaced by Frank P. Darlington.

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1906/09/06
from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company signed a contract with Lewis B. Hickman for the construction of a three-story addition to the original Barnard Street building. Its dimensions were 40'x50'.

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1906/10/12
from Peirce notes.

Contractor P. E. Jefferis got the contract to excavate and build the foundation of the new addition to the Denney Tag Company.

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1906/11/13
from Peirce notes.

The board of directors of the Denney Tag Company decided to substitute electric power for steam power in the new addition to the factory. The old steam boiler was taken out and the building was heated with steam from street mains. The brick work was nearly completed. Large, 40-foot rafters of Florida yellow pine were brought in to support the floors.

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1907/02/14
from Peirce notes.

At a monthly directors meeting, Mark H. Darlington was selected to replace Frank P. Darlington, who had been elected but was too busy to serve. Mark Darlington had been with the company since it was founded in West Chester in 1887.

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1907/03/15
from Peirce notes.

The directors of the Denney Tag Company voted to distrbute another 5% dividend, in addition to all of the others already distributed in the past year.

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1907/04/11
from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company finally began to receive machinery for which it had been waiting for months.

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1907/09/04
from Peirce notes.

The directors of the Denney Tag Company voted to distribute a 5% regular dividend and a 5% special dividend.

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1907/09/05
from Peirce notes.

At the annual stockholders meeting of the Denney Tag Company, the old directors were reelected. This year, the companies officers included George Huey as plant manager and George Connell as his assistant. Edwin Darlington was reelected president, A. D. Sharpless remained secretary and Mark W. Darlington remained treasurer.

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1908/02/15
from Peirce notes.

Despite the general depression that affected the whole country, the business of the Denney Tag Company remained strong.

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1908/03/04
"Lived Here Twenty Years" in Daily Local News (March 4, 1908), in CCHS clippings file: "S. Barber."

Samuel O. Barber celebrated the 20th anniversary of his arrival with his family in West Chester to take up the position of superiintendent of the Denney Tag Company. They arrived in March 1888. In 1908, "the Barbers are among the best known people here, [in West Chester] and highly respected on account of their worth and genial disposition."

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1908/03
from Peirce notes.

Since business had remained strong over the past six months, the directors of the Denney Tag Company voted to distribute a dividend of 7.5%.

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1908/06/11
from Peirce notes.

Although a new addition to the Denney Tag Company factory was completed last year, the factory was still too crowded. The directors signed a contract with Cloyd R. Baldwin to build a second addition of the same size next to the first.

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1908/08/01
from Peirce notes.

Work was underway on the new addition to the Denney Tag Company factory. The addition was located on the east side of the original factory, between it and Clinton Alley. The addition mweasured 24'x62', and was made of brick on a stone foundation, with iron roof construction.

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1908/09/03
from Peirce notes.

At the Denney Tag Company annual stockholders meeting (many of whom were women) John Thorp was elected chairman, and Mrs. Lillian Temple Scott and Miss Anna Garrett were selected as tellers.

Despite expenditures for a building addition and new machinery, the company paid out dividends of 17.5% in the past year.

The entire old board of directors was reelected, including A. C. Harmer of Philadelphia, Henry C. Baldwin, Albert P. Hall, Marshall S. Way, John E, Huey, Mark H. Darlington, A. D. Sharples, Maurice R. Travilla, and Edward Darlington of East Bradford.

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1908/09/10
from Peirce notes.

At the directors meeting of the Denney Tag Company, Edward (JJ: Edwin) Darlington was elected president, Maurice R. Travilla vice-president, Mark H. Darlington treasurer, and George Huey plant superintendent.

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1908/11/30
from Peirce notes.

At a special meeting of the directors of the Denney Tag Company, they agreed to build another addiition to the main factory to provide more office space. The contract went to Joseph H. Burns of West Chester.

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1908/12/02
from Peirce notes.

The new addition to the Denney Tag Company was almost finished.

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1908/12/15
"New Machines Arrive" in Daily Local News (December 15, 1908), from Peirce notes.

A number of new machines arrived at the Denney Tag Company and were installed in the new addition.

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1908/12/15
from Peirce notes.

The regular monthly meeting of the directors of the Denney Tag Company was held in the new addition.

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1909/01/09
Daily Local News (January 9, 1909), in CCHS clippings file "Keystone Tag Company."

"One of the signs which would seem to indicate that the business men of the country look for a revival of trade this year is the fact that both the Keystone Tag Company and the Denney Tag Company are unusually busy. Orders are coming in briskly from every section of the country. The inference is that other manufacturing firms, merchants and shippers expect to use a large number [of tags] this year."

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1909/02/10
Daily Local News ( February 11, 1909), from Peirce notes.

The board of directors of the Denney Tag Company declared a semi-annual dividend of ten percent. Business is very good and the company has doubled the size of its plant in the last two years, while still paying very large dividends.

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1909/03/19
"Purchase of Pierce Lot" in Daily Local News (March 19, 1909), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company bought the Joshua N. Pierce property on South Church Streets from real estate agent Lewis R. Downing for an undisclosed figure. Downing recently bought the house and brick stable for $6025. The company will take over the residence on April 1, 1909, after Mrs. Pierce vacates. [JJ: This may be the house at the corner of Union and S. Church, currently for sale by James Realty. The article says it was across the alley that ran behind the factory, and it had a deep lot fronting on Church Street.]

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1909/07/09
"To build another addition" in Daily Local News (July 10, 1909), from Peirce notes.

C. R. Baldwin began work on the construction of a 20'x50' addition to the Denney Tag Company, at a cost of $1997. This, the fourth addition in the factory's history, will enclose the east side of the original Barnard Street School, leaving only the facade. By the time it is finished, the entire factory will be three stories in height.

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1909/08/11
Daily Local News (July 3, 1909), from Peirce notes.

The board of directors of the Denney Tag Company called a special stockholders meeting to vote on whether to increase the company's capital stock from $25,000 to $100,000.

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1909/08/13
Daily Local News (August 13, 1909), from Peirce notes.

The board of directors of the Denney Tag Company declared a semi-annual dividend of 5% ($1/share) and a special dividend of 2.5% (50 cents/share), payable on Spetember 15, 1909.

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1909/08/30
Daily Local News (August 30, 1909), from Peirce notes.

The masonry contractors finished laying brick for the new Denney Tag Company addition on Saturday, and the roofers were expected to start work soon.

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1909/09/21
Edwin Darlington, "Annual Stockholders' Report of the Denney Tag Company" (September 21, 1909), from Peirce notes.

The company, with a capital of only $25,000, did business worth $45,918.25 and distributed dividends worth $8,051.65, or roughly 40.24%.

During the past year, the company made 62,000,000 tags. It spent $350.83 on utilities, divided between lights ($14.51), heat ($101.92) and power ($236.40).

The company distributed a dividend of 7.5% in March, another of 7.5% in September, and a special dividend of 5% in September, for a total of 20% or $4000.

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1910
A. D. Sharpless, memo to the directors of the Denney Tag Company (November 9, 1910), from Peirce notes.

The company paid an annual stock dividend in two semi-annual installments of five percent ($2000), or a total of $4000 for the entire year. The company showed good earnings of $15,844.97 on the year, despite the loss of the cotton tag trade. The following figures show the company's gross sales from 1905-1910, and earnings for 1910.

year/gross sales/net earnings
1905/$23,265.48/
1906$35,179.03/
1907$48,206.50/
1908$45,918.25/
1909$93,734.18/
1910$90,517.02/$15, 844.97

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1912/09/13
"Old agreement on file" from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company bought additional tag and stringing machinery from Albert Potter of Elmer NJ for $850. That sum included the services of Mr. Potter to set up the machine in the West Chester factory.

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1913/02/13
"New Addition" in West Chester Star (February 13, 1913), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company announced plans to build a three-story addition on the west side of their Barnard Street plant. The new brick building would extend for 40 feet along Barnard Street and for 70 feet back towards Church. [JJ: This is the fifth addition to the building.]

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1913/02/26
Original document on file (May 26, 1913), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company purchased the George E. Malin property at 26 W. Barnard (east of the alley) for $1500. It also bought the Plummer E. Jefferis property at 32 W. Barnard for $900. At the time, George M. Huey was vice=president of the company.

The Denney Tag Company bought the E. A. Deaver property at 222 S. Church. This property was known as the "Gaum Guest House" (or Gahm?) and adjourned the Denney Tag Company property. It was used to house 30 West Chester State College students. After the first floor was converted to offices, the upper floors continued to be used by students.

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1913/12
West Chester Star (May 30, 1914) from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company opened an addition to its Barnard St. plant that increased the space four times.

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1914/01/15
from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company announced its regular five percent semi-annual dividend, plus a special dividend of $1/share.

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1914/05
West Chester Star (May 30, 1914) from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company company's business increased after the opening of its plant addition at the end of 1913. By May 1914, the company sold tags to customers in the USA, India, Mexico, Cuba, Australia, South & Central America, Puerto Rico and Canada.

The factory contained all modern equipment, including a fire suppression system connected to a 25,000 gallon tank. [JJ: note fire at Keystone Tag Company about this time]

The company employs 75 to 80 people who turn out two to 2.1 million tags per day. They also completed various commercial printing jobs.

The company is the second oldest tag printing firm in the country. It was founded in Philadelphia, but moved early to West chester, where it was incorporated on August 12, 1887.

Its president was Marshall S. Way, senior partner in the real estate, loan and insurance firm of Mashall S. Way & Son; vice president and general manager George M. Huey; treasurer Mark H. Darlington, and secretary A. D. Sharpless.

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1917/01/26
"Shorter Hours at Tag Factory" in Daily Local News (January 26, 1901), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

The Denney Tag company cut the number of hours in the working week to forty for its employees, but kept salaries the same. Men were required to start at 7:20am and women at 7:30am. This was an overall reduction of two hours per week.

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1917/02/27
"Tag Stringing Industry" in Daily Local News (February 27, 1917), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses-- Denney Tag."

Italian families in the boro's west end organized themselves to earn money by stringing tags for the Denney Tag company. Each morning, a horse and wagon delivered thousands of tags to the neighborhood, and in the evening, it took the finished work back to the factory.

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1917/04/03
"Reinforcing the Walls at Tag Factory" in Daily Local News (April 3, 1917), from Peirce notes.

Iron girders were added to the original walls of the Denney Tag Company factory on W. Barnard Street (an old school) to help support the weight of the heavy machinery on the third floor. In all, 150 tons of structural steel were employed.

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1917/05/07
"Directors Meet" in Daily Local News (May 7, 1917).

About thirty of the young women employees of the Denney Tag company "congregated at the factory doors and refused to go to work unless they were promised more wages. The strikers, brunettes and blondes, tall, stout, short in variety with luncheon under their arms, chatted considerably, joked and walked about, but there was no disorder or badinage."

The women wanted higher pay. At present, they earned between $5.50 and $7.50 a week for a workday from 7:30 to 5:44pm, with fifty minutes off for noon break. One dollar of their salaries was in the form of a "bonus" against which the company made deductions for tardiness and other infractions. The women asked for an additional dollar per week.

The superintendent responded that the company "was paying as much or more than other establishments employing women" and "the majority of the girls made over $7 a week." "There were two or three employees, ring-leaders, who had caused this dissension, most of the employees being entirely satisfied until being tampered with."

After promises to look into the question, the women began work and everything was normal by 9am.

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1917/05/18
Daily Local News (May 18, 1917), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company held a ceremony to dedicate a 10'x15' American flag intended to show support for President Wilson's declaration of war in Europe. The flag was purchased with money that began with a collection by company employees. It was placed on a flagpole on top of the building.

As a reward, at some time in the future (summer?), the Denney employees were all invited to be guests of the management at Lenape Park.

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1917/05/21
"Flag Ceremony" in Daily Local News (May 21, 1917), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company held a ceremony at its factory to demonstrate its support for the American entry into World War I. The main event was the presentation of a large American flag to be displayed on the side of the Denney Tag Company. The West Chester Band played, officials made speechs, and the crowd sang patriotic songs.

Workers at the factory began to congregate a half hour early for the 3pm event [JJ: evidence of "goofing off" or resistance?]

Herman E. Roller, a company executive, introduced the speakers, Reverend John Mills Gilbert of Church of the Holy Trinity, Burgess J. Paul MacElree, and then himself. Roller "urged every man present who came within call of the draft to be issued, to show his red blood by going to the registration booth on the day to be named and to give his name as one who is ready to answer the President's call."

Frank P. Thomas, one of the oldest Denney Tag employees, carried the flag and presented it to company president Marshall S. Way. State Senator T. Lawrence Eyre received an introduction and applause, and then "West Chester's well-known singer" Norbert B. Hamilton sang the "Star-Spangled Banner."

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1917/11/01
Daily Local News (November 1, 1917), from Peirce notes.

Councilman John Thorp was elected to the board of directors of the Denney Tag Company to replace Albert P. Hall after his death.

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1918/12/02
DENNISON and 1166, in COURT OF APPEALS OF DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 48 App. D.C. 213; 1918 U.S. App. LEXIS 2380 (December 2, 1918).

November 12, 1918, Submitted December 2, 1918, Decided
PRIOR HISTORY: [**1] Patent Appeals.

HEARING on appeals from decisions of the Commissioner of Patents sustaining petitions for the cancelation of registered trademarks. Affirmed. The facts are stated in the opinion.

DISPOSITION: Affirmed.

HEADNOTES: TRADEMARKS; CANCELATION.

1. Words, letters, figures, or symbols not denoting origin or ownership, but merely indicating quality, are not registrable.

2. In a trademark cancelation proceeding, the interest of the petitioner is sufficient to form the basis of a petition to cancel the registered trademark of his adversary, where it appears that the marks, consisting of letters, were used by the registrant merely as grade marks, and that the petitioner had been using substantially the same marks in the same way. (Following Tim & Co. v. Cluett, P. & Co. 42 App. D. C. 212.)

COUNSEL: Mr. A. V. Cushman, Mr. Chas. S. Grover, and Mr. Charles D. Woodberry for the appellant. Mr. James A. Watson for the appellee.

JUDGES: Mr. Justice ROBB [*214] Mr. Justice ROBB delivered the opinion of the Court:

These are appeals from decisions of the Patent Office tribunals sustaining appellee's petition for the cancelation of the letters "D," "T," and "T C," which appellant, the Dennison Manufacturing Company, theretofore had registered as trademarks for tags.

The Patent Office, after a review of the evidence, found that appellant had not used these letters as trademarks, but merely as grade marks; and, since it appeared that appellee, the Denney Tag Company, was using substantially the same marks in the same way, sustained the petition for cancelation. This action clearly was right; for words, letters, figures, or symbols not denoting origin or ownership, but merely indicating quality, are not capable of exclusive appropriation. Lawrence Mfg. Co. v. Tennessee Mfg. Co. 138 U.S. 537, 547, 34 L. Ed. 997, 1003, 11 S. Ct. 396; [**2] Columbia Mill Co. v. Alcorn, 150 U.S. 460, 463, 37 L. Ed. 1144, 1146, 14 S. Ct. 151.

The interest of appellee was sufficient to form the basis for its petition to cancel. Tim & Co. v. Cluett, P. & Co. 42 App. D.C. 212. The decisions are affirmed.

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1918/12/27
(1918), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company bought two houses in Denney Court from Rebecca Evans for $2350 on December 27, 1918.

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1920/01/21
"Installing 21, 1920), in CCHS clippings file "WC Business Houses -- First National Bank, 1920-1924." [JJ: Misfiled]

The Denney Tag company installed an electric elevator in its brick warehouse on W. Barnard Street.

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1923/06/23
Daily Local News (June 23, 1923), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

On the occasion of remodeling of the Denney Tag Company Building, this article appeared with various nostalgic bits about the company and the neighborhood.

"Every morning at six o'clock may be seen a train of small express wagons drawn by boys and girls, mostly Italians, on their way to the plant, every wagon piled high with boxes of tags which have been strung at homes of workers and are now being returned. Motive power for these wagons is largely supplied by girls of the grammar grades in school. They have jet hair and glistening black eyes, and many of them wear small earrings. While waiting for the doors to open and admit them and their tags, they jump rope and have many other games, occasionally singing the latest American songs. While they have the Italian cast of countenance, their speech is purely American and their slang is up to date."

There are two other tag companies in West Chester, the Keystone and the Lucas.

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1923/08/31
(1923), from Peirce notes.

On August 31, 1923, the Denney Tag Company bought the M. Channing Way property at 27 Dean Street for $5185.

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1936/02/14
Daily Local News (February 15, 1936), from Peirce notes.

John Huey, son of Denney Tag Company president George M. Huey, gave a lecture at the Knights of Columbus Home in which he described the company's history. He was introduced by Philip J. Reilly, Esquire, following a Knights of Columbus business meeting chaired by Grand Knight J. Arthur Lewis.

"Mr. Reilly spoke of the Denney Tag Company as one of the strongest connecting links which West Chester has with all parts of the world."

The Denney Tag Company employed 400 people in West Chester.

John Huey was an official with the Denney Tag Company.

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1940s
"Denney Tag among first borough industries" in Daily Local News (May 4, 1991), A8.

The Denney family sold its last interest in the company in the 1940s.

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1941/06/11
Daily Local News (June 11, 1941), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

The Denney Tag Company announced that employees would receive their second raise since last November, and as of July 1, 1941, the minimum wage for all women would be $0.40/hour, and $0.50/hour for men. The company operated on a 40-hour week. The company president, George M. Huey, also announced that all employees would receive a bonus in May equal to one week's wages.

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1944/01/27
Daily Local News? (January 27, 1944), from Peirce notes.

Business was good thanks to government contracts, according to the annual report at the stockholders' meeting. George Huey was relected president of the board, while Lewis W. Darlington and Oscar W. Cunningham were elected vice presidents. C. H. Padmore became secretary-treasurer, . L. Merrick was elected assistant secretary-treasurer.

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1945/03/27
Daily Local News? (March 27, 1945), from Peirce notes.

The company received one of the largest contracts in its history from the War Department. It will take six months to fulfill.

Returning servicemen from West Chester mentioned seeing tags and boxes from the Denney Tag Company all over the world.

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1945/04/19
Daily Local News? (April 19, 1945), from Peirce notes.

At a special stockholders meeting, it was voted to increase the number of company directors from seven to nine. A. Roberts Sharples of Drexel Hill (formerly a director before going to work for the Navy Department) and W. Perry Tyson of Downingtown (vice president of First National Bank of West Chester) were elected to the board.

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1945/05/02
Daily Local News? (May 2, 1945), from Peirce notes.

The federal government sued two tag companies for violating the OPA (Office of Price Administration) regulations. The government asked for triple damages of $20,400 from the Reyburn Manufacturing Company, 16th & Indiana Avenue, Philadelphia; and $13,500 from the Denney Tag Company of West Chester.

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1945/05/22
Coatesville Record (May 22, 1945), from Peirce notes.

Denney Tag Company shares sold at $60 per share, three times their par value of $20.

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1946/03/28
Daily Local News? (March 28, 1946), from Peirce notes.

The increase in the value of Denney Tag Company stock became apparent when one thousand shares were listed on an inventory of Mrs. Emilie V. Harmer's estate. Their value was listed at $80,000, or a $60,000 gain [JJ: 300%] since 1888.

The stock was included in a trust for the Harmer's daughter, Mrs. Edwina H. Jarden of Ardmore. However, she died last October 3, 1945. Her two sons Richard and Charles E., plus a daughter Mrs. E. Virginia Blake, each received $32,520 in the final distribution of the trust.

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1946/06/05
Daily Local News? (June 5, 1946), from Peirce notes.

Harold H. Woodward joined the Denney Tag Company to replace Wilmer M. Thomson, who left after 23 years with Denney to serve as full-time president of the West Chester Paper Box Company. Woodward left a position as manager of the West Chester office of the US Employment Service.

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1948/02/06
Daily Local News? (February 6, 1948), from Peirce notes.

At a speech before the monthly Rotary Club meeting held at the Mansion House, Denney Tag Company treasurer Casper H. Padmore said that the company had sold 8,300,000 tags on 1947 [JJ: should this be 8,300,000,000?] and grossed $20,100,000. He also estimated that a single $20 share purchased in 1888 was now worth between $1850-2000.

The company employed 275 people at its factory in West Chester, and eighty salesmen on the road. Padmore estimated that the company put $750,000-800,000 into the borough economy.

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1948/06/28
Daily Local News? (June 28, 1948), from Peirce notes.

Additions were underway to the Denney Tag Company. In the process, the separate buildings of the company were brought under one roof, the shipping department was moved from Clinton Alley (which was bricked in) to a new three-story facility on the Union Street side of the property, and a new addition was built along Church Street. Simultaneously, the layout of the factory was reconsidered to take advantage of the fact that it was now housed in a single building.

Clinton Alley was only 14 feet wide, and it had long been a bottleneck for the movement of supplies and tags in and out of the factory complex.

The president of the company was Gibbons G. Cornwell.

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1948/12/31
Daily Local News? (December 31, 1948), from Peirce notes.

While work on a new watertank on the roof of the Denney Tag Company was underway, it collapsed. No one was injured. The work on the tank, which stands atop a steel tower 75-100 feet tall, began on 12/29. About 11:00, as the tank's wooden sides were nearly completed, a few timbers began to fall, followed by all of the rest.

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1949/05/16
Daily Local News? (May 16, 1949), from Peirce notes.

The weather indicator, which had long stood on the old Denney Tag Company water tank, was placed back into service on the new tank.

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1949/07/26
Daily Local News? (July 26, 1949), from Peirce notes.

The August calendar of the Denney Tag Company included some historical information on the company, plus two engravings showing the original Barnard Street school and the present building along with the aditions whose construction was in progress. When finished, the building will be 17 times as large as the original school building..

In the old days, the school was headed by Principal Sara Starkweather.

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1950/04/07-08
Daily Local News (April 7, 1950), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company hosted a two-day sales convention for its sales force at the Mansion House Hotel. About forty salesmen were expected to attend. On the first evening, sales manager Horace Y. Sumption was the toastmaster, President Gibons G. Cornwell spoke, and William Kelgard gave the featured address.

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1951/05/03
"Increased Capitalization" in Daily Local News (May 3, 1951), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company directors reorganized the company's stock and issued 200,000 five dollar shares, for a total capitalization of one million dollars.

J. Paul MacElree was the solicitor.

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1951/05/11
Daily Local News (May 12, 1951), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company honored its bowling teams at the Fifth Annual Bowling Banquet last evening. It was held at the Bernard Schlegel Americal Legion Home.

The Denney Tag team won the Thursday Night Major League at the YMCA. The team's captain was John Kirk, who bowled for Denney for thirty years. [JJ: John Kirk must have started work at Denney before 1921.]

The company's personnel manager, Harold Woodward, was the toastmaster.

Other members of the "championship machine shop team" included Captain Mercer Beaumont, Joe Sabatini, Jhon March, Fred Veser, and Herb Thomson.

The winning girls team in the factory league included Hazel Robinson, Rose Hartz, Betty Ritter, Erma Able, and Ruth Heller.

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1953
Hazel Lovell, interview by Jim Jones (Wentworth Home, February 5, 2002).

Hazel's husband Alton was an accountant at the Denny Tag Company, where he retired in about 1953. He died in 1965.

Hazel grew up on Rocky Hill Farm south of West Chester near Route 202.

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1953/05/23
Daily Local News (May 23, 1953), from Peirce notes.

At the 7th annual bowling awards banquet, held at the American Legion Post, the Denney Tag team was honored as winners of the YMCA Thursday Night League. Members of the team included Eddie Ruggerio, Arnold Lear, Fred Veser, Jerome Etty (Eddy?), and Charles Lamber. Each received a hat presented by Harold Woodward, the company's personnel manager.

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1953/07/08
Chamber of Commerce of Philadelphia News (July 8, 1953), from Peirce notes.

The tag industry underwent changes as tags were redesigned and put to more uses.

"Production Control Tags" were attached to objects as they passed through the variouss tages of a factory, to keep track of the work done on them.

"Shipping and Handling Tags" got a product to its destination, and sometimes carried instructions for use.

"Adver-tag" was a Denney trademark tag used to advertise products.

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1954/07/14
Chamber of Commerce of Philadelphia News (July 14, 1954), from Peirce notes.

This is a brief history of the Denney Tag Company. The first president was Samuel L. Denney, the inventor of the first automatic tag printing machine. The company's two slogans were "Better Tags Since 1887" and "The Right Tag for the Right Purpose."

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1955/07/28
Daily Local News (July 28, 1955), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

Edward F. Beatty, president of the Keystone Tag Company, approached Gibbons G. Cornwall, president of the Denney Tag Company, with an offer to sell the Keystone. At this point, they had reached no agreement.

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1955/08/08
Daily Local News (August 8, 1955), from Peirce notes.

A leak in the sprinkler system at the Denney Tag Company about 2:00am triggered an alarm bell in the building, but did not result in a false alarm to the fire company. The night watchman called a mechanic to fix the leak.

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1955/08/09
Daily Local News (August 9, 1955), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

The Denney Tag Company completed the purchase of the Keystone Tag Company, effective August 8. Keystone will continue to operate for the time being, and some of its 50 employees would be incorporated into the Denney work force of about 250.

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1955/08/09
Daily Local News (August 9, 1955), in CCHS clippings file "Keystone Tag Company."

The Keystone Tag Company was sold to Denney Tag Company. Keystone Tag Company had 50 employees at time of sale while Denney Tag Company employed 250 people.

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1956/01/20
Daily Local News (January 20, 1956), in CCHS clippings file "Keystone Tag Company."

Keystone Tag Company formally becomes non-existent as a single corporation when Denny Tag Company absorbs the entire Keystone Tag Company. 54 Keystone Tag Company employees were assured jobs at Denney Tag Company, located at 30 West Barnard Street.

Miss Henrietta Fetters, who has held an office position with Keystone Tag Company for 33 years, was made Sales Promotional Manager at Denney Tag Company. Ms. Fetters was previously the Secretary-Treasurer at Keystone Tag Company, where she was a (trusted and respected) executive, "held in high regard by Keystone Tag Company] employees who served under her guidance."

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1956/10/01
"The Denney Tag Company" in Daily Local News (October 1, 1956), from Peirce notes.

This is a brief history of the Denney Tag Company that contains no new details. It mentions the move to West Chester in 1887, Denney's invention of the automatic tag printing machine, the presidents (Denney, C. Wesley Talbot, Edwin P. Darlington, Marshall S. Way, George M. Huey, and Gibbons Gray Cornwell. It mentions a list of products including the "Advertag."

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1957/10/22
Daily Local News (October 23, 1957), in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Business Houses--Denney Tag."

Employees of the Denney Tag company voted against unionization with the International Brotherhood of Bulk, Sulphite and Papermill Workers (AF of L-CIO) by a vote of 98-74.

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1958/02/05
Daily Local News (February 6, 1958), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company hosted "Padmore Night" at the West Chester Golf & Country Club to honor retiring vice president and treasurer, Casper H. Padmore.

Padmore first joined the company on December 26, 1923. After retiring on February 13, 1958, he remained as a director of the company.

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1958/02/15
"For Sale" in Daily Local News (February 15, 1958), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Business Houses, Denney-Reyburn Co."

H. N. Nash & Co. of Philadelphia offered 200 shares of Denney stock at $30.50 a share.

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1958/11/04
Original manuscript, "Purchase of the Central Tag Company" (November 4, 1958), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag company announced the purchase of the Central Tag Company of 2725 W. Harrison Street, Chicago. It was sold by the elderly widow of one of the founders. Wilmer Thomson and Ike Davis supervised the takeover, but the company remained under the direction of its general manager and current vice president, Mr. William Ferguson.

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1960/12/05
Original document signed by President Gibbons Cornwell (December 5, 1960), from Peirce notes.

The Denney Tag Company sold the Central Tag Company division one day after it purchased the Reyburn Company of Philadelphia. They sold it because Bill Ferguson, the manager hired from the old Central Tag Company, wanted to retire. The company also feared efforts to unionize the employees in the Chicago factory.

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1960/12/22
Daily Local News (January 5, 1961), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Business Houses, Denney-Reyburn Co."

The Denney Tag Company purchased the Reyburn Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia, makers of tag-printing machinery.

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1961/01/04
Daily Local News (January 5, 1961), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Business Houses, Denney-Reyburn Co."

The stockholders of the Denney Tag company voted to change the firm's name to the Denney-Reyburn Company, following the December 22, 1960 purchase of the Reyburn Manufacturing Company by Denney. Denney President Gibbons G. Cornwall said that heavy machinery from the Reyburn plant in Philadelphia would be moved to the Denney factory on Barnard Street or to the old Keystone Tag company building in Mechanics Alley.

Reyburn manufactured tag-making equipment. It operated since before the turn of the century in two divisions--one in Philadelphia and a "display division" in Royersford, PA. Reyburn's display division continued to operate independently as the "Reytrim Manufacturing Company" after the sale of the Philadelphia division to Denney.

Denney was founded in 1887 by Samuel L. Denney, "the inventor of the first fully automatic tag-making machine."

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1962/08/17
Daily Local News (August 17, 1962), from Peirce notes.

Following the acquisition of the Reyburn Company, Denney- Reyburn employed 100 salesmen around the country. The company was one of 20 firms to join the Tag and Label Manufacturers' Institute, a trade organization.

The company began to sell tag imprinters manufactured by the WAM company of Germany. They sold these tag imprinters to tag manufacturers and retail stores.

Several factory employees had more than 25 years of service: Charles R. Aldworth, Leon O. Anderson, Mercer H. Beaumont, William M. Benn, Jerome P. Etty, Florence B. Marvey (Harvey?), Frank D. Johnson, Atley R. Nesbitt, An Nichols, Margaret Peoples, Edward F. Ruggiero, Martha Stanley, Mary . Tompkins, Charles E. Travis, Elsie Alton, Arthur Way, Kenneth Webster.

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1964/06/20
Daily Local News (June 20, 1964), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Business Houses, Denney-Reyburn Co."

Workers at the Denney-Reyburn Co. voted 110-80 to reject a proposal by the United Textile Workers of America (AFL-CIO) to unionize the company. Six employees voted to join the Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers.

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1965/08
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (August 1965), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn company began to make fanfold pressure- sensitive labels in three sizes, packed in cartons of 5000.

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1965/12
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (December 1965), from Peirce notes.

The Carl Draper Company of Los Angeles was selected as the official representative of the Denney-Reyburn Company on the West Coast. It will serve as the warehouse for orders in five states including Alaska and Hawaii.

In the same issue, Jack Ribnick and Miles Serling of Ribnick, Serling Associates were appointed as sales representatives for the company in the greater New York area.

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1966/07
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (July 1966), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company bought out the tag operations of the St. Regis Paper Company of St. Regis, Missouri.

The company began to manufacture satin cloth pressure- senstive labels for use in the textile business. They replaced pin labels.

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1966/08
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (August 1966), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company bought equipment to manufactured four-color pressure sensistive labels.

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1966/10
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (February 1968), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company opened a new manufacturing facility in Chicago.

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1967/01/31
Daily Local News (January 31, 1967), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Business Houses, Denney-Reyburn Co."

The Denney-Reyburn Company reached an all-time sales high in 1966. It produces tags, pressure-sensitive labels, business forms, pin tickets, and gummed labels. It employs 300 people in two plants in West Chester, and has warehouses in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Texas.

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1967/02
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (February 1967), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company announced the introduction of a new product--a line of index tabs preprinted with the months, the alphabet and other common organizing systems.

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1967/03/02
Daily Local News (March 2, 1967), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Business Houses, Denney-Reyburn Co."

The Denney-Reyburn Co. announced its purchase of 20 acres in West Goshen for the construction of a new factory.

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1967/04
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (April 1967), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company announced that it had acquired an IBM 360 computer for accounting and inventory control. George Smethurst was the data processing manager, and Tim Cornwell helped to program the machine.

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1967/09/15
Daily Local News (West Chester, September 16, 1967) in CCHS clippings file "West Chester Transportation, PARR"

Fire destroyed the Pennsylvania Railroad freight station on Union Street on September 15, 1967. The article includes details` on the fire, and also describes what kind of business went on at the station.` The station was no longer fully utilized, so the Lasko Products Co. used much of the building to store paint. The cost of damage to the building was only about $4000, but three boxcars at the station were damaged, resulting in losses of about $10,000. Two boxcars contained rolls of paper for the Denney-Reyburn company, another had cereal and gravy products from the Grocery Store Products company.

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1968/02
"Gibbons Cornwell Retires" in Impressions, Denney- Reyburn Co. publication (February 1968), from Peirce notes.

Denney-Reyburn Company president Gibbons Cornwell retired after 23 years with the company as assistant sales manager, sales manager, and general manager. He was elected president on January 24, 1945. He also served one term as the Burgess of West Chester, is the president of the Board of Managers of Chester County Hospital, and a member of the board of directors of the National Bank of Chester County & Trust Company.

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1968/02/14
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (February 1968), from Peirce notes.

Wilmer Thompson, vice-president and treasurer since 1958, was elected president of the Denney-Reyburn Company on February 14, 1968. He was with the company for 30 years and served as vice- president of the Chester County Federal Savings and Loan Assocation. He was also past president of the West Chester Paper Box Company for ten years.

The board also reelected Howard Y. Sumption as VP-Secretary, Robert J. Wilson as assistant treasurer, and William B. Merrick as assistant secretary.

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1968/02/15
Daily Local News (February 15, 1968), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Business Houses, Denney-Reyburn Co."

The Barnard Street building was used for company offices and as a warehouse, but no longer housed any manufacturing operations.

Wilmer Thompson, chairman of the company, lived at 19 North Hill Drive. He worked for Denney for over 30 years and was formerly the vice-president/treasurer of the company.

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1968/07/29
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (July 1968), from Peirce notes.

A window and wall at the Barnard Street factory were dismantled to allow the removal of tag presses to the new facility, two miles away.

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1968/09/28
"Denney-Reyburn Dedicates New Plant" in Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (November 1968), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company dedicated its new plant on the Rte. 202 Bypass on Saturday afternoon, September 28, 1968. Besides the company officers, this article mentions that F. Ellis Green was the plant superintendant, and William J. McGrogan was the plant engineer. The Reverend Alfred Jackson, a long-time employee, gave the invocation. Jack Hines led the pledge of allegiance.

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1968/11/01
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (November 1968), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company purchased all of the stock of the Dancyger Manufacturing Company of Cleveland OH, a tag and label company established in Dayton in 1886. In 1906, it moved to Cleveland, where it built what became the oldest continuously operating factory in the city.

Dancyger became a wholely-owned subsidiary of the Denney- Reyburn Company. It employed over 100 people and had over one million dollars in annual sales, mainly in the Midwest.

With this acquisition, the Denney-Reyburn Company had manufacturing facilities and warehouses in West Chester, Chicago and Cleveland, plus additional warehouses in Dallas and Los Angeles.

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1969/02
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (February 1969), from Peirce notes.

George Smethurst was elected as assistant vice president of Denney-Reyburn Company, while F. Ellis Green and David Peirce were elected as vice presidents.

Peirce joined the company in 1968 as assistant to the president, after 15 years in the tag industry.

Green was hired as production superintendent in 1965 and recently promoted to manager of research and development.

Smethurst was manager of data processing. He joined the company in 1966.

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1969/03
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (March 1969), from Peirce notes.

Recently, Leonard Gehrig, founder of the International Ennis Business Forms, announced that his company would buy the machinery of the International Tag and Business Forms Company of Chicago. The machinery was located in a building leased to Ennis' National Business Forms subsidiary. Ennis was based in Texas.

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1971/02
"Peirce Elected to the Board" in Impressions, Denney- Reyburn Co. publication (February 1971), from Peirce notes.

David Peirce was elected to the board of directors of the Denney-Reyburn Company, along with Harry E. Cann, G. G. Cornwell, J. Gibson McIlvain, Wilmer M. Thomson, A. Roberts Sharples, N. Harlan Slack Jr., Charles E. Swope and Channing Way Jr.

Thomson was elected president, Peirce and Robert J. Wilson VPs, Kenneth J Hemphill teasruer, Lewis T. Brown assistant treasurer, Horace Y. umpton secretary, William B. Merrick and George A. Smethurst assistant secretaries.

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1973/02/15
"Wilmer M. Thompson Retires" in Impressions, Denney- Reyburn Co. publication (February 1973), from Peirce notes.

Thomson retired and David L. Peirce was appointed president of the Denney-Reyburn Company.

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1976/07
"Nancy A. Thompson Apponted District Representative" in Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (July 1976), from Peirce notes.

Ms. Thompson was the first woman to receive an appointment as a district sales representative for the Denney-Reyburn Company in Greenville SC.

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1976/11/09
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (November 1976), from Peirce notes.

James W. Gordon was appointed to the newly created position of Director of Marketing by David L. Peirce, president of the Denney-Reyburn Company. Gordon was with the company for 11 years.

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1977/05
Program, Denney-Reyburn Co. Retiree's Luncheon (Treadway Inn, May 17, 1977), from Peirce collection.

This program contains photos of employees, plus captions that list their names.

Mae E. Taylor
Margaret Dempsey
Margaret Groff
Barbara Hall
Erma Dove

Emmet S. Gordon
Kenneth Webster
Wilmer M. Thompson
Ruth McFadden
Ida L. Lawson

Maude E. Littlefield
Helen Bradley
Henrietta Fetters
Horace Y. Sumption

Milford Mangin
Carl W. Hendrickson Sr.
Charles Aldworth
Arnold Lear
John T. Dawson

Leona Herr
Thelma Kulp
Madalaine Lawson
Delia M. Hill

Marwood B. Meredith
Ralph Marsh
Howard M. Grant
Louis Liberato
Wallace Taylor
Robert Becker

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1978/01
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (January 1978), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company completed the renovations of the offices at its company headquarters in West Chester.

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1978/04/28
Daily Local News (May 1, 1978), from Peirce notes.

Gibbons Cornwell, chairman of the board of directors of the Denney-Reyburn Company, married the mother of A. Thomas Parke III. She was the former Mrs. Arthur T. Parke Jr. of West Chester.

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1979/04
"Three Vice Presidents Elected" in Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (April 1979), from Peirce notes.

Three men were elected as vice presidents of the Denney- Reyburn Company: Jim Gordon, Kenneth Hemphill, and Dominic DiSanto of the Dancyger Division.

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1979/07
"The Cornwells in Auto Acident" in Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (July 1979), from Peirce notes.

Mrs. Cornwell was killed in an automobile accident.

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1979/08
"Denney-Reyburn Installs New Computer with Built-In Future" in Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (August 1979), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company installed a Honeywell Level 62 computer to replace the IBM360/20 used for the last 11 years. It will allow employees to access the computer through multiple workstations, and eliminate punched cards.

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1979/10
"Ray Steen Appointed Gaphic Arts Supervisor" in Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (October 1979), from Peirce notes.

Ray Steen was placed in charge of graphic arts at the Barnard Street plant of the Denney-Reyburn Company.

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1979/12
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (December 1979), from Peirce notes.

John J. Zellman was appointed credit manager of the Denney- Reyburn Company, replacing Lewis T. Brown, who retired at the end of 1979 after 22 years of service.

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1980/01
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (January 1980), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company opened a new manufacturing plant in Phoenix AZ. WC production manager Thomas Morris and his wife will take care of the new office. Tom has been with the company for 33 years.

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1980/04
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (April 1980), from Peirce notes.

Nancy Thompson was appointed SE regional sales manager for the Denney-Reyburn Company. The SE region includced NC, SC and Georgia.

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1980/12
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (December 1980), from Peirce notes.

David Peirce retired as president of the Tag and Label Manufacturers Institute. He joined the board of directors of the Denney-Reyburn Company in 1971 and served two terms as president in 1978 and 1979.

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1981/12
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (December 1981), from Peirce notes.

N. Harlan "Kim" Slack III was appointed manufacturing manager of the Denney-Reyburn Company, replacing Robert Becker, who retired. Kim joined the company in 1973.

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1983/04
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (April 1983), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company held training sessions for its sales personnel in new technologies such as bar-coding, OCR tags, heat transfer printing, and cohesive tags.

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1983/05/17
Souvenir Program, Denney-Reyburn Co. Annual Retiree's Luncheon (West Chester Inn, May 17, 1983), from Peirce collection.

This program contains photos of employees, plus captions that list their names.

Rose Messner, Erma Dove and Margaret Dempsey. Paul Ramsey and Edward Stoltz

Arnold Lear, Lewis Brown, Horace Sumption, Milford Mangin, Charles Aldworth, Edward Ruggiero, and Lewis Nichols.

Edward Stoltz, William Alber, Kim Slack, Shirley Crandley, June Hatter, Marwood Meredith, Jack Dawson, Jack Yarnall, and Phebe Bard.

"A shrinking carnation between two roses? Shirley Crandley, Jack Yarnall and June Hatter."

"Dave Peirce is suspected of mixing politics and pleasure talk with Wallace Taylor."

Virginia Widener, Gibbons Cornwell (former president and present board member), Lou Liberato and Walter Adams.

Louis Liberato, Joe Sabatini, Walter Adams, Larry Woodward, Wallace Taylor, Vernon Ritter, and Carl Hendrickson

Ann Nichols, Madalaine Dawson, Ruth McFadden, Henrietta Fetters, Helen Lewis, Virginia Widener, Emma Garrett, and Rose Hartz.

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1983/05/17
Draft of news release (May 1983), in Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company purchased the Perrygraf company, the country's largest producers of linear and rotary slide charts.

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1983/06
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (June 1983), from Peirce notes.

Yhe Denney-Reyburn Company introduced a new product designed to keep computer printouts from tearing apart at the seams.

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1983/12
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (December 1983), from Peirce notes.

Vice president Edmond K. Kiechilin announced his retirement from the Denney-Reyburn Company. He joined the sales force in 1963 as New York office manager.

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1984/09
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (September 1984), from Peirce notes.

Richard Abele was appointed production supervisor.

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1985/11/15
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (November 1985), from Peirce notes.

The Denney-Reyburn Company purchased the Colonial Label Company of West Bridgewater, MA. It was formerly known as the Waldoroth Label Company for the past 50 years, manufacturer of tags and labels for the bedding and furniture industries.

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1985/12/04
Tom Jensen & Brian McCullough, "Trucker Shot on Rt. 202 Bypass" in Daily Local News (December 5, 1985), 1.

An independent tractor-trailer operator from near Scranton picked up a shipment from the Denney Tag Company which was currently being struck by Teamsters Local #107. As he drove up the 202 bypass, someone fired a bullet through his windshield that grazed his ear. Although there was no proof, some suspected that it was the act of union members.

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1985/12/11
"An Open Letter to the Public . . . Denney Reyburn: A Strike With A Purpose" in Daily Local News (December 11, 1985), 21.

This is a full page advertisement paid for by Teamsters Local #107, Joeseph Cimino, President, that lists the workers' grievances. Along them were hourly wages of only $6, management's failure to acknowledge worker seniority, management threats against anyone who supported the union, and more.

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1985-1986
"Denney Tag among first borough industries" in Daily Local News (May 4, 1991), A8.

The company faced a violent 8-month strike by Teamsters Local 107 in 1985-1986. Although the employees voted down the union in March 1986, the company lost money for the next three years.

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1986/06
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (June 1986), from Peirce notes.

During the past year, the Denney-Reyburn Company, like thousands of other companies, hustled to comply with new OSHA regulations concerning the use of hazardous materials.

George Highley retired after 45 years, and William McGrogan retired after 39 years.

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1986/08/04
Impressions, Denney-Reyburn Co. publication (August 1986), from Peirce notes.

Kenneth Hemphill was appointed vice president for the Eastern Division of the Denney-Reyburn Company.

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1986/10/15
Daily Local News (October 16, 1986), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Business Houses, Denney-Reyburn Co."

CEO Wilmer Thompson and President David Peirce of the Denney- Reyburn Company attended a ground-breaking ceremony for a new manufacturing plant at S. Matlack and US202 to replace the Barnard Street building, which was recently sold. The new building will become the company's headquarters and should be ready by May.

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1986/12
Impressions, a monthly newsletter from the Denney- Reyburn Co. (December 1986), from Peirce collection.

p1The company created a telemarketing branch under the control of Robert Doherty.

The centerfold contains "Holiday Greetings from us all" with photos of employees, plus captions that list their names.

p3[From the Dancyger Division]
Marie Kubitz, Ken Patterson, Bonnie Jones, Phyllis Kubal, Dunkan Logue, Rose Mezaros, Dominic DiSanto (General Manager), plus Bill Sch[illegible]

p3[From the Perrygraf Division]

Cathie Smith: Director of Marketing
Jim McCarthy: General Manager
Dwayne Haase: Production Manager
Susan Wisegarver: Assistant Production Manager

Tim Scott, Patty Ostroff, Michelle Masciotra, Eli Mouradian: Sales

Mike Zilinsky: Manager, Design/Production Art
Maureen Johnson: Supervisor, Production Art

Lori Ali, Chris Gabbert: Customer Service
Cassandra Thompson: Receptionist

p4

David L. Peirce, president
Beverly Reese, Dave Wilds, Dee Warren: Marketing Services
Kenneth Hemphill, Division Manager
Helen Wright, Sharon McHenry, Bob Eaves, Jim Gordon: Sales
Richard Eves, Kathy Hill: Estimating
Joe Grubb, Elizabeth Stringert: Perrygraf
Mark Ledman, Sara Huggins: Accounting

p5

Bob Doherty, Barbara Hoopes, Cathy Dunleavy, Jim Mailliard: Dealer Line
Jack Zellman, Maureen Rusling: Accounting
Jim Hashimoto, Melanie ruggieri, Karen Fidanza, Andrea Hugues: Advertising
Helene Szabo, Carol Barwise, Rachel Woodward, Grace Hunt: Order Process
Sandra Arnold, Deborah Davis, Lauren Simpson, Robert Brakel: Office staff
Maureen Flanagan, Art field: Purchasing
Marie Harrison, Kellie Riggins, Mildred McCallin, Connie Weaver: Computer Department
George Smethurst, Kelly Essick, Denise Devine, Leon Woodward: Computer Department

p6(from the Western Division)

Thomas Morris, General Manager
Daniel Left, Sales Manager
Larry Sample, Production
Denise Hennings, Ann Morris: Office
Sharyn Williams, Liza Martens, Christ Coyle: Customer Service
Carl Glorioso: Sales Manager
Leslie Schmidt, Tom Payne, Ken Kraft: Sales
Tom Morin, Flexo Manager
Nancy Canty: Offset & Silk Screen Manager
John Fitzwater: Plant Manager
Charles Salamone: General Manager
Bob Bambrick: Estimating
Lorraine Luck: Personnel
Dottie Banks: Recpetionist
Jeannie Fox: Accounts Receivable
Bob Steward: Marketing Service Manager
Joe Dacey: Controller
Mary Hanley: Accounting
Denise Blackstrom: Estimating


p7Alice Soja was appinted secretary to the board of directors, after Horace Y. Sumption resigned. Ms. Soja worked for Denney for the alst 14 years, including 7 years as secretary to the president and the last two years as assistant secretary to the board.

p7N. Harlan "Kim" Slack III was appointed R&D manager. He joined the company 13 years ago and served as plant superintendant for the last five years. Before that, he served as Assistant Plant Manager, Traffic Manager, Government Contract, Marketing Services and Slide Chart Division. He was a graduate of Wittemberg University of Ohio. He lived with his wife Kris and a son in East Bradford.

p7Horace Y. Sumption resigned after nearly 60 years with the company. He had already retired as VP Sales in 1969, and worked as corporate secretary since that time.

p8Edward Joseph Logan Jr. was appointed plant superintenant for the Eastern Division in West Chester. He was a consultant hired from American Management Resources (AMR) of Valley Forge (outside the company).

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1986/12/04
"Yarris' (December 31, 1986).

On December 4, 1986, a truck that left the Denney-Reyburn factory, where a strike was in progress, was struck by a bullet while traveling on US 202.

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1988/late
"Denney Tag among first borough industries" in Daily Local News (May 4, 1991), A8.

In 1988, the Chicago consulting firm of Shiras, Bell & Company bought the Denney-Reyburn Company for $7.5 million. [According the the Dave Peirce interview, Winfred Shiras and Thomas Bell were industry consultants from Chicago and West Chester, respectively. They operated the company at a loss for one year, and then sold it to the Menasha Company.]

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1990/early
Steve Reinbrecht, "Denney-Reyburn Co. Closing" in Daily Local News (May 4, 1991), A1.

The Menasha Company of Wisconsin bought the Denney-Reyburn Company in 1990 from Shiras, Bell & Company.

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1991/07
Steve Reinbrecht, "Denney-Reyburn Co. Closing" in Daily Local News (May 4, 1991), A1.

The Denney-Reyburn Company announced plans to close by the end of July 1991. This was not a surprise, since the company laid off about 80 employees last year. It was already "insolvent" when bought out by the Menasha Company last summer.

The article mentioned Rachel Woodward who worked at Denney- Reyburn for nine years, and Den Komaromi, company vice-president. [JJ: Handwritten note from David Peirce says that Komaromi worked for Goodyear for 22 years before 1986, and he was "Gen. Mgr. for Molded Prods, Plastic Div, of Menasha for 5 1/2 yr before coming to D/R." He was the managing director of Denney-Reyburn from February 1, 1991 to July 15, 1991.]

A Denney-Reyburn employee, who asked not to be identified beause he hoped to remain with Menasha, said that the company never recovered from a violent 8-month strike in 1985-1986.

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