HIS logo Assignments for HIS 397
Topics/World: Revolutionary Africa

What's New?

Dec. 6 : Added the topic for the last exam on Wednesday, December 11 at 3:30pm.
Nov. 1: Added optional assignment on Azawad due Dec. 2


Class discussion (most Wednesdays and Fridays)

The purpose of class discussion is to share different viewpoints between the members of the class. To do that successfully, you must come to class with a viewpoint that 1) shows you read the assigned reading, 2) includes additional information that shows you attempted to understand anything that wasn't clear in the assigned reading, and 3) shows tolerance of differing viewpoints. In addition, your participation should encourage others in the class to participate as well.

For each class discussion, you will receive 3 points for participating well, 2 points for showing up and appearing unprepared, 1 point for showing up without speaking and 0 points for failing to show up at all.

Possible points (out of 500): 60

Nasser and the Egyptian Revolution (due Friday, Aug. 30)

Using the WCU Library website (www.wcupa.edu/library.fhg/), go to "Databases," select "N" and click on the link to "New York Times, 1851 - Present." Locate and read the following articles. (Hint: search for "Egypt" and "Nasser" between 1952-1956)

1) "Egypt Gives Naguib Year's Full Power: Cabinet Extends Decree Rule -- Drive on Reds as Wafd's Co-Plotters Launched" (January 18, 1953), page 1.
2) Kennett Love, "Cairo Charges Foreign-Aided Plot And Imposes State of Emergency" (Sept. 16, 1953), page 1.
3) Robert C. Doty, "U. S. Warns Egypt On 'Neutralism'" (Jan. 7, 1954), page 4.
4) Robert C. Doty, "Moslem Brotherhood Is Banned by Egypt" (Jan. 14, 1954), page 1.
5) "Naguib Quits in Cairo Row; Nasser Takes Premiership" (Feb. 25, 1954), page 3.
6) "New Cairo Leader was a Rebel at 17" ( Feb. 26, 1954), page 3.
7) Robert C. Doty, "Naguib Restored as Egypt's Leader in Sudden Switch" (Feb. 28, 1954), page 1.
8) Kennett Love, "Naguib is Deposed as Coup plotter by Egypt's Junta" (Nov. 15, 1954), page 1.
9) Robert C. Doty, "Egypt Will Defer Democratic Rule" (May 19, 1955), page 9.
10) Osgood Caruthers, "Egyptians Vote for Nasser Rule" (June 24, 1956), page 1.

Then write a short paper (2-3 pages double-spaced with a 12 pt. font and 1" margins on standard 8 1/2" x 11" paper) that explains how the New York Times viewed Gamal Abdel Nasser and the situation in Egypt. Turn in your paper at the beginning of class on Friday, Aug. 30. Papers submitted after the beginning of class on Aug. 30 will not be accepted. The same is true for papers submitted by email or written by hand.

Possible points (out of 500): 30. Optional for students whose WCUID# ends in 0-5.

Investigating the Algerian revolution (due Friday, Sep. 13)

As you read William H. Lewis, "The Decline of Algeria's FLN", look for something that you wish you knew more about. Then use that as a search term to find a second article on JStor. Read it and prepare to explain what you learned to the rest of the class on Friday. Then write a brief paper (2-3 pages) explaining four things: the name of your topic, what article you read to learn about it, what your topic is, and what is its relationship to the Algerian revolution.

Print out your paper using a 12 pt. font and 1" margins on both sides of standard 8 1/2" x 11" paper. Staple multiple pages together in the upper left-hand corner. Turn in your paper at the beginning of class on Friday, Sep. 13. Papers submitted after the beginning of class will not be accepted. The same is true for papers submitted by email or written by hand.

Possible points (out of 500): 30. Optional for students whose WCUID# ends in 6-9.

First examination (Wednesday, Sep. 18)

Bring two pens -- one to write and the other as a spare -- to class with either blue or black ink (but not red, green or other "artistic" colors). You will receive a blue book in which to write your answer, and a sheet with an essay question that will ask you to draw parallels between the revolutions in Egypt, Kenya and Algeria.

Possible points (out of 500): 100. Mandatory for all students.

Revolt in the Congo AFTER Independence (due Friday, Sep. 27)

Using the WCU Library website (www.wcupa.edu/library.fhg/), go to "Databases," select "N" and click on the link to "New York Times, 1851 - Present." Locate an analytical article by searching for "Congo" and "analysis" between June 30, 1960 and Jan. 1, 1965. Read as many articles as you need to explain why a revolt began in the Congo after independence was granted.

Then write a short paper (2-3 pages double-spaced with a 12 pt. font and 1" margins on standard 8 1/2" x 11" paper) that explains your answer. To be complete, your paper must refer to the motivations of at least two of the following "players": Kasavubu, Lumumba, Tshombe, Mobutu, the Belgians, the USA and the USSR.

Turn in your paper at the beginning of class on Friday, Sep. 27. Papers submitted after the beginning of class on Aug. 30 will not be accepted. The same is true for papers submitted by email or written by hand.

Possible points (out of 500): 30. Optional for students whose WCUID# ends in 6-9.

Second examination (Wednesday, Oct. 16)

Bring two pens -- one to write and the other as a spare -- to class with either blue or black ink (but not red, green or other "artistic" colors). You will receive a blue book in which to write your answer, and a sheet with an essay question that will ask you to draw parallels between the post-independence revolutions in the Congo, Nigeria and Angola.

Possible points (out of 500): 100. Mandatory for all students.

Scrutinizing Fanon (due Friday, Nov. 1)

When Fanon wrote The Wretched of the Earth in 1961, he assumed that his readers would know a great deal about current events. Each student will learn more about and report to the class on one of these topics -- look for your name in red next to your assigned topic.

  1. "Prix Goncourt" (page 9 in my copy of Wretched of the Earth) - Brian B.
  2. "example of Katanga" (page 11) - John
  3. "African authenticism" (page 12) - Tyrone
  4. "Monsieur Guy Mollet and the settlers" (page 61) - Randi
  5. "Behanzin" (page 69) - Brendan
  6. "Soundiata" - (page 69) - Justin
  7. "Samory" - (page 69) - Reed
  8. "Abdel Kader" - (page 69) - Evan
  9. "Setif in Algeria" (page 72) - Blanton
  10. "Central Quarries in Morocco" (page 72) - Elizabeth
  11. "Moramanga in Madagascar" (page 72) - Tom
  12. "Sharpeville (page 75) - Tyler
  13. "Mr. Mennen Williams' last journey" (page 79) - Ryan
  14. "Phouma and Phoumi" (page 81) - Brian H.
  15. "Ahidjo and Moumie" (page 81) - Phoenix
  16. "Col de Sakamody" (page 89) - Jeff
  17. "Phillippeville" (1955) (page 90) - Richard
  18. "Tiaroye-sur-Mer" (aka Thiaroye) (page 230) - Yusuf

Your task is to find out what he was referring to and why he referred to it in his book. In other words you must not only determine the "who, what, when, where and why" of the item that Fanon mentioned, you must also explain the context of its appearance in Fanon's book -- what Fanon was writing about and how your topic serves as an example. You may use (and cite Wikipedia) to get started, but you must find at least two other sources from books in the WCU Library or articles at JStor (i.e. do not rely on other people’s web pages), and use them to write the majority of your paper. Cite all of your sources using endnotes in the format specified by the Chicago Manual of Style (Turabian). [See a primer on the Chicago style.]

Write a short paper (2-3 pages double-spaced with a 12 pt. font and 1" margins on standard 8 1/2" x 11" paper) that explains your answer. Turn in your paper at the beginning of class on Friday, Nov. 1. Papers submitted after the beginning of class will not be accepted. The same is true for papers submitted by email or written by hand.

Possible points (out of 500): 30. Mandatory for all students.

The Future of Tunisia (due Friday, Nov. 22)

Based on our discussion of the background to Mohamed A. El-Khawas, “Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution: Causes and Impact” write a short paper that answers the question "What role did globalization play in Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution?"

You will probably want to search journalistic and academic sources on-line (i.e. JStor, NY Times, BBC, Tunisian newspapers, but not Wikipedia or traveller blogs) for information with which to formulate your answer. Your essay need only be a short paper (2-3 pages double-spaced with a 12 pt. font and 1" margins on standard 8 1/2" x 11" paper), but you must cite the source(s) of your information using the Chicago/Turabian style. Turn in your paper at the beginning of class on Friday, Nov. 1 and be prepared to discuss your answer in class. As usual, papers submitted after the beginning of class will not be accepted. The same is true for papers submitted by email or written by hand.

Possible points (out of 500): 30. Optional for students whose WCUID# ends in 0-5.

Azawad (due Monday, Dec. 2)

During the last week of the semester, we will examine the revolution that began in Mali in 2012. It was neither isolated nor unexpected, but was instead the most recent stage in a conflict that has existed for centuries. Using academic sources (i.e. JStor, library books, but not newspapers, Wikipedia or traveller blogs) explain what Azawad means, the history of the dispute since independence, and the issues behind the 2012 revolution. Write up your explanation in a short paper (3-5 pages double-spaced with a 12 pt. font and 1" margins on standard 8 1/2" x 11" paper). Cite your sources using the Chicago/Turabian style. Turn in your paper at the beginning of class on Monday, Dec. 2 and be prepared to discuss your answer in class sometime during the week. As usual, papers submitted after the beginning of class will not be accepted. The same is true for papers submitted by email or written by hand.

Possible points (out of 500): 30. Optional for everyone.

Final exam (Dec. 11, 3:30-5:30pm)

As with the previous two essay exams, you should bring two (blue or black ink) pens to the exams -- one to write and the other as a spare. You will be allowed to use your notes, but no electronic devices. You will receive a blue book in which to write your answer, and a sheet with the following essay question:

Using examples from throughout this semester, but especially South Africa, Tunisia and Mali, discuss the extent to which Fanon's analysis of revolution is relevant in the era of neo-liberalism (i.e. after the oil crisis, debt crisis and structural adjustment reforms imposed by the World Bank).

Possible points (out of 500): 150. Mandatory for all students.


Go to the HIS397 syllabus or visit Jim Jones' other course web sites at courses.wcupa.edu/jones .

Copyright 2011 by Jim Jones